Supreme Court Decides Korkoya’s Fate Today

first_img– Advertisement – NEC Chair Jerome Kokoya By Abednego DavisA decision is expected today on whether or not Cllr. Jerome G. Korkoya will remain as head of the National Elections Commission (NEC).The announcement was made yesterday by Associate Justice Philip A.Z. Banks, who presided over the legal argument regarding Korkoya’s dual citizenship.Today’s expected judgment emanated from a complaint filed to the Supreme Court by Dr. Togba-Nah Tipoteh, a presidential hopeful in the upcoming elections, against Korkoya where he claimed a Writ of Prohibition.The Writ of Prohibition is an order from the superior court to a lower court directing the judge and the parties to cease the litigation, because the lower court has no proper jurisdiction to hear or determine the matter.Before today’s ruling, Korkoya had argued that the lawsuit against him was “a dangerous game,” and a clever attempt by politicians to take away his Liberian citizenship and to make him stateless.Korkoya also contended that Dr. Tipoteh lacks the legal capacity to determine whether or not he is a citizen because that decision is in the purview of the Attorney General and the Minister of Justice.Tipoteh’s lawsuit seeks the intervention of the Supreme Court to prohibit Korkoya as NEC chairman from conducting the October elections because he is a citizen of the United States by his alleged possession of that country’s passport and for voting in US elections.Tipoteh also argued that in order for the results of the national elections to be considered credible, the legal capacity of persons conducting the elections, especially its chairman, who speaks for the Board of Commissioners and presides over its meetings, must not in any respect be in doubt.“The NEC requires that all candidates and voters participating in the 2017 presidential and representative elections comply with the Election Laws of Liberia and for the Commission to have the moral authority to rigorously enforce all provisions of said law, the Commission and its members must obey, abide by and comply with every provision of the Election Laws of Liberia,” Dr. Tipoteh said.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Saturn found to have noontime auroras

first_img Auroras on Earth occur when magnetic reconnections (magnetic fields colliding) cause solar flares on the sun. When it happens, plasma carrying a magnetic field is shot out into space, some of which makes its way to Earth. When it collides with our planet’s magnetic field, auroras occur. The same process has been observed on Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus.In this new effort, the researchers were studying data sent back from the Cassini spacecraft, which orbited Saturn for 13 years. They were looking specifically at data that would provide more information regarding magnetic reconnections on the planet—prior research had shown that they occur on the dayside of the magnetopause (the point where the planet’s magnetic field meets the solar wind). There was also evidence that they occur on the nightside of its magnetodisk, which is a plasma ring formed near the equator by water and other materials emitted from its moons. But prior research had also suggested that there would be no reconnections on the dayside of the planet’s magnetodisk because the solar winds made the ot too thick for them to occur. But the researchers found evidence of reconnections in the magnetodisk at noontime anyway. The researchers suggest this apparent anomaly is likely due to Saturn’s high spin rate (a day is just 10 hours). The high rate, they note, likely compresses the magnetodisk , making it thin enough for reconnections to occur. The team also suggests that the reconnections they measured appear to be strong enough to create auroras.The researchers suggest that their findings indicate that unknown auroras might be happening on other planets as well, but have been overlooked because planet spin speed was not factored into calculations. They further suggest that similar reconnections might also be behind some unexplained pulses seen from Jupiter. Journal information: Nature Astronomy More information: R. L. Guo et al. Rotationally driven magnetic reconnection in Saturn’s dayside, Nature Astronomy (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41550-018-0461-9AbstractMagnetic reconnection is a key process that explosively accelerates charged particles, generating phenomena such as nebular flares, solar flares and stunning aurorae. In planetary magnetospheres, magnetic reconnection has often been identified on the dayside magnetopause and in the nightside magnetodisc, where thin-current-sheet conditions are conducive to reconnection. The dayside magnetodisc is usually considered thicker than the nightside due to the compression of solar wind, and is therefore not an ideal environment for reconnection. In contrast, a recent statistical study of magnetic flux circulation strongly suggests that magnetic reconnection must occur throughout Saturn’s dayside magnetosphere. Additionally, the source of energetic plasma can be present in the noon sector of giant planetary magnetospheres. However, so far, dayside magnetic reconnection has only been identified at the magnetopause. Here, we report direct evidence of near-noon reconnection within Saturn’s magnetodisc using measurements from the Cassini spacecraft. The measured energetic electrons and ions (ranging from tens to hundreds of keV) and the estimated energy flux of ~2.6 mW m–2 within the reconnection region are sufficient to power aurorae. We suggest that dayside magnetodisc reconnection can explain bursty phenomena in the dayside magnetospheres of giant planets, which can potentially advance our understanding of quasi-periodic injections of relativistic electrons6 and auroral pulsations.Press release: phys.org/wire-news/289642898/m … anetary-differe.html Hubble spots auroras on Uranus This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Saturn found to have noontime auroras (2018, June 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-saturn-noontime-auroras.htmllast_img read more