A Way Amidst the Wildfires

first_imgSubscribe in Daily Dose, Featured, Loss Mitigation, News Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago October 25, 2018 1,627 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Tagged with: California CoreLogic Homes HOUSING Insurance Property real estate wildfires California CoreLogic Homes HOUSING Insurance Property real estate wildfires 2018-10-25 Radhika Ojha Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago A Way Amidst the Wildfires Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Previous: Risky Business Next: Citadel Launches New Product Sign up for DS News Daily Share Save A webinar hosted by CoreLogic, available to the public here, discusses the housing situation in California in light of recent wildfires. The webinar, entitled “California Wildfires: A Way Forward,” explores at length the Carr and Mendocino Complex Fires from 2017, the damage the fires caused to more than 10,000 structures. The webinar looks back as well as forward, considering next steps in reconstruction after what has occurred and increasing resilience to future fires.Maiclaire Bolton-Smith, a Sr. Leader for Research and Content at CoreLogic, hosted the webinar. She touched on the catastrophe in Mendocino County before detailing the worst of the 2017 wildfires, especially the extent of damage in Tubbs County. Howard Kunst, a Principal and Chief Actuary of Science and Analytics at CoreLogic, gave a statistical perspective on the fires, showing how even though the amount of acreage destroyed in fires has increased in relation to the number of overall fires started. Whereas the five-year average between 2012 and 2016 was 8,363 fires with 691,299 acres destroyed, in 2017 a total of 9,560 fires caused more than 1.2 million acres worth of damage. Kunst suggests that models have obtained a high enough degree of accuracy regulations based on their predictions will be more commonly enacted. One of these is the requirement going into effect July 2019 that mandates insurance companies discuss the likelihood of fires to customers with residential properties, as well as various strategies and costs of reconstruction. Guy Kopperud, a Principal of Industry Solutions with CoreLogic, focused his discussion on reconstruction and valuation. Kopperud dilated on how the heated market in California continues to interfere with reconstruction efforts, and how the surge in California housing demand affects contractors and builders in the state. Rodney Griffin, Sr. Leader of Product Management and Services, spoke about resilience to future fires and strategies for minimizing damage in future disasters. These include fire-resistance ratings for construction being promoted as well as construction with fire-resistant materials.  Griffin indicates that the costs of building with resilient materials can be justified by the bottom line and reduction in loss potential. Lastly, Tom Larson, a Principal in Industry Solutions closes with a focus on managing wildfire risk in the future, in the process highlighting how fires in 2017 challenged current zonation, and how different models for zoning could help manage risk. Larson shows how if one also accounts for infrequent high winds and the latest fuel and topography models, risks can be minimized. Considering that more than 1.7 million homes, or 13 percent of the total 13.6 million California homes, remain at risk today. The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago About Author: Staff Writer Related Articles  Print This Post Home / Daily Dose / A Way Amidst the Wildfireslast_img read more

Coupling of climate change and biotic UV exposure through changing snow-ice covers in terrestrial habitats

first_imgDuring the spring, when ozone depletion at the polar regions is at its maximum and consequently the environmental UV exposure is potentially high, many terrestrial communities are covered in snow and heterogeneous snow-encrusted ice that form near the edges of snowpack. Using field measurements and a theoretical radiative transfer model, we calculated the thicknesses of these covers that are necessary to reduce DNA-weighted dose to levels equal to or lower than those received later in the season in the absence of covers when there is no ozone depletion. This depth is approximately 4 cm for a 60% depletion of the ozone column, suggesting that even thin snow-ice covers are enough to completely cancel the biological effects of ozone depletion. Loss of snow-ice covers during early summer can be rapid. The maximum rate of retreat of snow cover measured during November at Mars Oasis, Antarctica (71.9degreesS, 68.2degreesW), was 44.1 cm/day, with a mean retreat of 15.4 cm/day. Climate warming might increase UV-radiation damage by melting UV-protecting terrestrial snow-ice covers earlier in the season, when ozone depletion is more severe. Conversely, climate cooling could increase UV-protection afforded to terrestrial communities by increasing the extent of snow and ice covers. Even if anthropogenic ozone depletion is eventually reversed, these data suggest the importance of climate forcing in determining UV exposures of terrestrial microbial communities in snow- and ice-covered environments.last_img read more

HMM CEO Wins Three More Years

first_imgSouth Korean shipping company Hyundai Merchant Marine (HMM) has extended the term of its Chief Executive Officer (CEO) C.K. Yoo. until 2021.“All employees of HMM – with a sense of great duty and mission as the only national ocean carrier – will give our all to leap forward as one of the top global shipping carriers.”  “We believe that HMM will gain great cost-competitiveness and strengthen its sales power,” Yoo said.The term extension is being reported in the light of the company’s 42nd regular shareholders’ meeting held at the HMM’s headquarters in Seoul.Yoo is expected to resume the company’s fleet renewal campaign which has seen HMM order construction of five very large crude carriers (VLCC) last year at DSME and acquire two 11,000 TEU containerships.Earlier this week, the company announced it had secured USD 420 million to finance the construction of the quartet.As announced by Yoo in January, the company intends to double its vessel capacity by 2022.As part of the plan, HMM revealed an investment in the construction of 22,000 TEU newbuilding that is expected to be formalized shortly.Furthermore, the company has launched a digitalization of its operation via a switch to a Cloud-based next-generation system, planned to be completed by 2020.Image Courtesy: HMMlast_img read more

Becoming a starter for Syracuse football has given Christopher Fredrick a ‘taste’ of what he came to SU for

first_imgAs training camp finished, Christopher Fredrick didn’t like having to look up on the depth chart as a safety-turned-cornerback. He saw four players ahead of him. That’s not exactly the way he wanted to start his redshirt freshman year.“I was kind of struggling, frustrated with that,” Fredrick said.So he went to safety Rodney Williams and cornerback Juwan Dowels for advice. “Don’t focus on it too much,” Fredrick said of what they told him. “Just go to practice every day just working on getting better every day so that when my time does come I’ll be ready.”The time came against then No.17-Virginia Tech on Oct. 15 — Syracuse’s biggest win of the year. A secondary decimated by injuries lost cornerback Cordell Hudson before the game, thrusting Fredrick into his first starting role. Fredrick has now started at corner for SU (4-5, 2-3 Atlantic Coast) each of the last three weeks. Hudson came off the injury report last week but didn’t play, leaving Fredrick to start once again in his place.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThough he’s had an up and down first year, Fredrick is determined to hold on to the starting role that he got the chance to grab.“It is a great feeling actually working hard and finally getting to display what you’ve been working toward,” Fredrick said. “It’s really satisfying.”His playing time through the first six games consisted mostly of special teams and garbage time work. He recorded one tackle, on a kickoff in the first quarter against Louisville, but that was it.Then the Orange lost Dowels for the season in Week 2 and Hudson, who has yet to return, heading into Week 7. Fredrick leap frogged over Carl Jones, who had been the third option at corner, when Hudson went out.Fredrick packed on the pounds in the last year, bumping up from 173 when he first got to Syracuse to about 194 now. His long arms help in press coverage and knocking down balls and improving his footwork to pick up the slack. He’s spent extra time in the film room, starting with before the VT game, to figure out where he’s supposed to be on plays and what he’s supposed to do.“He’s just been sitting back, staying the course, keep working hard,” Williams said after the win over Virginia Tech. “… Going forward I think he’ll give us a really good chance to win.” There’s been the good: a four-tackle outing against the Hokies that started off with a tackle behind the line on a reverse. Fredrick delivered several big hits, including a key stop on third down. The run defense is where he thinks he’s performed the best.Then there’s the bad: allowing touchdown passes against Virginia Tech and Clemson. VT’s was a 12-yard fade to Isaiah Ford that Fredrick was in position for but didn’t look up when the receiver did. Fredrick went for Ford’s hip instead as the ball floated overtop. At Clemson, Fredrick was the victim of a 65-yard pass down the sideline. The receiver got in his blind spot, he said, and sped by.“Not good at all,” Fredrick said of his game against Clemson.Fredrick insists he took a step back in his performance against Clemson. But he’s trying to make sure he doesn’t slip too far away from where he now is.He’s focused on open field tackling heading into the game against North Carolina State and keeping players out of his blind spot.For the most part, though, he’s happy with where he’s at.“You know where you were at before,” Fredrick said. “Now you’re getting the taste of what you really came here for. You got to keep going. Keep getting better so you won’t be back at that place you were before.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 10, 2016 at 11:47 pm Contact Jon: [email protected] | @jmettuslast_img read more