€55,000 funding for anti-bullying training

first_imgNewsEducation€55,000 funding for anti-bullying trainingBy John Keogh – September 17, 2014 715 TAGSbullyingDepartment of EducationEducation Minister Jan O’Sullivan Advertisement Delay in Limerick schools patronage process ‘unacceptable’ Previous articleFree tests in Limerick to protect against sight lossNext article1,000 Limerick people run 5k with Ray John Keoghhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Beyond the neon runes New UL president invited independent inquiry WhatsApp Jan O’Sullivan, the Limerick minister who will be involved in the launch of the new energuy initiative “Let’s Conserve Energy Together Better.”Education Minister Jan O’SullivanEDUCATION Minister Jan O’Sullivan has announced that €55,000 in additional funding is to be provided for nationwide anti-bullying training sessions for parents this year.This figure is in addition to the €60,000 originally allocated this year, bringing the total allocation for 2014 to €115,000.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The Anti-Bullying Parent Training Programme is run jointly by the National Parents Council Primary NPC-P and the National Parents Council Post Primary NPC-PP to support the implementation of the Action Plan on Bullying, which called for training and resources for parents and boards of management.Minister O’Sullivan commented: “I recognise the very high level of demand among parents for this type of training.  Parents need the tools and know-how to support their children in preventing bullying from happening and in dealing with it when it does arise – in particular, I have already been contacted by many parents who are seeking more support in helping their children to combat cyberbullying.”She also thanked the NPC-P and the NPC-PP for their work in delivering the sessions and noted the very positive feedback from participants.The Minister encouraged all parents to avail of the training  and said: “Everyone in the wider community has an important role to play in tackling all forms of bullying and in teaching children how to manage relationships, be resilient and have empathy for others. Bullying is not a problem schools can or should be left to tackle alone.”In 2013, funding of €60,000 supported the delivery of 105 anti-bullying parent training sessions to 3,279 parents nationwide.It is expected that the funding in 2014 will allow more than 200 sessions to be organised throughout the country. Printcenter_img Linkedin Read Your Mind launches in Limerick City and County Libraries Email RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 142 Limerick schools benefit from minor works scheme Twitter €20 million funding plan for Limerick Institute of Technology Facebooklast_img read more

Court blocks Alabama from executing Muslim inmate without his imam present

first_imgKuzma/iStock(ATLANTA) — A federal appeals court on Wednesday blocked the execution of a Muslim inmate in Alabama after the state refused to allow his imam to be at his death instead of a Christian prison chaplain. The United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit granted an emergency stay of execution for 42-year-old Domineque Ray one day before he was scheduled to be put to death for the rape and murder of 15-year-old Tiffany Harville more than two decades ago in Selma, Alabama. The Alabama attorney general’s office has asked the United States Supreme Court to vacate the stay and let it proceed with the execution scheduled for Thursday evening, according to court documents. “The central constitutional problem here is that the state has regularly placed a Christian cleric in the execution room to minister to the needs of Christian inmates, but has refused to provide the same benefit to a devout Muslim and all other non-Christians,” a panel of three district judges wrote in their decision Wednesday. Ray has been held at the Holman Correctional Facility in Atmore, Alabama, since he was convicted and sentenced to death in 1999. He has been a devout Muslim since at least 2006 and has been meeting with his current imam who has provided religious ministry to Muslim inmates like Ray since 2015, according to court documents. On Jan. 23, two weeks before his scheduled execution, Ray met with the prison warden who, apparently for the first time, explained the practices and policies that the Alabama Department of Corrections adheres to during executions. Among other things, the warden told Ray that a Christian chaplain employed by the department would be in the death chamber as a lethal cocktail of drugs is administered. The inmate’s designated witnesses, along with any spiritual adviser other than the prison chaplain, may be seated in a witness room, separated from the execution chamber by a large window, according to court documents. Ray asked if he could bring in his imam in place of the prison chaplain, but was told his request couldn’t be honored due to the department’s policy. Ray and his attorneys filed a civil rights complaint and an emergency motion for stay of execution on Jan. 28, claiming the policy violated his constitutional rights. The Alabama Department of Corrections has agreed to exclude the prison chaplain from the death chamber, but a district judge on Friday denied Ray’s initial request for a stay of execution. The judge wrote that Ray waited “until the eleventh hour” to make his legal claim, it’s a matter of safety and security, and Ray’s imam, who is not a department of corrections employee, is “untrained, inexperienced and outside the state’s control.” Ray filed an appeal and the court overturned the denial. “We welcome this decision and hope Mr. Ray will ultimately be provided equal access to spiritual guidance,” Ali Massoud, the government affairs coordinator for the Alabama chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), said in a statement Wednesday. The three-judge panel wrote in their decision that it was “exceedingly loath to substitute our judgment on prison procedures,” but that “it looks substantially likely to us that Alabama has run afoul of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment.” “What is central to Establishment Clause jurisprudence is the fundamental principle that at a minimum neither the states nor the federal government may pass laws or adopt policies that aid one religion or prefer one religion over another,” the judges wrote. “And that, it appears to us, is what the Alabama Department of Corrections has done here.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more