Analysts predict Canary Wharf buyout

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Stars Support British Red Cross Nepal Earthquake Appeal

first_imgCelebrities are rallying around to support the British Red Cross’ Nepal Shop Drop – raising vital money for those affected by the earthquake, just by donating unwanted clothes.Since the 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal last month, the generous British public have raised £3 million through the British Red Cross’ Nepal Earthquake Appeal.Now people can boost urgent funds by dropping off clothes and goods to one of the Red Cross’ 330 charity shops across the UK – and many famous names are doing just that.Actor James McAvoy said: “Many of us here in the UK, including myself, have been moved by the images of devastation coming from Nepal. The people there have had their lives, homes and livelihoods torn apart.“More money is needed to help families and communities to get through the next few weeks and months, recovering and rebuilding their lives.”Public figures on Twitter have been backing #ShopDrop and asking supporters to get involved – including actor Simon Pegg, singer Conor Maynard and presenter Laura Whitmore.Actor and comedian Victoria Wood has also pledged to clear out her wardrobe. After all, a single carrier bag has an average value of £25: enough for 11 blankets, nine mosquito nets or three tarpaulins.Wood said: “I’ve been a fictional Red Cross shop worker myself in the film Housewife 49. I played Nella Last, a real life Red Cross volunteer who ran a shop in wartime – so I know how valuable these donations have been for more than 70 years.”She added: “This week is Red Cross Week, so let’s make it really count. Please dig out any unwanted stuff and drop it at your local shop. With your help, we can tackle the crisis in Nepal.”last_img read more

Manitoba raids Dakota smoke shop seizes Mohawk cigs

first_imgAPTN National NewsIt didn’t take long for Manitoba tax authorities to strike.Agents with Manitoba Finance’s special investigations unit along with the RCMP raided a Dakota-run smoke shop Tuesday, seizing 89,550 cigarettes made by a Mohawk tobacco firm that were being sold without a provincial license.In a brief statement, the department said the Dakota Chundee smoke shop, which was being run by three Dakota First Nations, was raided at about 12:20 p.m. Tuesday.The seized cigarettes, which were made by Rainbow Tobacco based out of the Mohawk community of Kahnawake near Montreal, were federally licensed, but not stamped for sale in the province.“The investigation is continuing and charges are pending,” said the statement.The Dakota’s opened the smoke shop, which sits about 100 kilometres southwest of Brandon, Man., last Wednesday and invited media to attend. There were also plans to open an unlicensed casino alongside the smoke shop.Canupawakpa Dakota Chief Frank Brown could not be reached for comment.Rainbow Tobacco president Robbie Dickson could not be reached for comment.The Dakota hoped to raise much needed revenue through the smoke shop and casino, while also upping the stakes in their court battle with the federal government.“If they raid us and seize and confiscate and charge, what laws are they using against us,” said Brown in a previous interview. “There is no process with non-treaty in Canada, so what laws are they going to legally use?”Ottawa considers the Dakota “American Indian refugees” and claims they have no Aboriginal title or rights to territory in Canada.The case is ongoing in Federal Court.Manitoba is now the fourth province to have seized Rainbow Tobacco cigarettes, joining  Alberta, British Columbia and Saskatchewan.Rainbow Tobacco pays federal taxes on each of its cigarettes, but refuses to pay provincial taxes arguing provinces have no jurisdiction to interfere in trade between First Nations communities.The Assembly of First Nations backs Rainbow Tobacco’s position.last_img read more