Top 14: French leave no easy option

first_img“Leicester was an important phase for me,” he explained to the newspaper. “It’s there I constructed part of my career as a player but above all, where I constructed my life as a man…certain evenings were long. Very long. I sometimes felt alone. But it forged my character. I was obliged to go towards others, to force myself to make the efforts to understand.”Staying power: Iain Balshaw had a successful time at BiarritzFans see their heroes only on match day when it’s hard to imagine that a player, amid an afternoon of raucous applause, might ever be lonely. But professional players spend a lot of the week away from the training ground and their teammates. As Dupuy discovered it can be hard to fill those long hours if you’re by yourself in a foreign country and an incomprehensible language.Unquestionably the players who make an effort to integrate are the most likely to succeed in France. As the former Scotland wing Tony Stanger admitted in 2001, shortly after his return from an ill-fated season in Grenoble: “Communication can be a problem, especially if you don’t speak French.”Part of that comes down to personality. The more outgoing the player the more likely he’ll want to engage with the locals. Trevor Brennan, Jamie Noon and Iain Balshaw are three examples of players who got on so well with the French they settled in the country after retirement.But application is also important. A good number of players who failed in France did so because they were either too lazy or too proud to learn French. Learning any language requires humility and one must be prepared for the odd pratfall. So what if the locals give the odd giggle? Hand in hand with the amusement is respect.Close ties: Jonny Wilkinson retains ties with Toulon even after retirementOf course, the British player who’s been the biggest success in France was no extrovert. But Jonny Wilkinson was intelligent, open-minded and fully committed to the club he was joining. “You want to go somewhere and have the opportunity to make a difference,” he once said of his decision to join Toulon. “You have to make a decision when you go there how much you will embrace the culture and the language. So Jonathan Davies is the latest player to fall short in France. The 27-year-old centre announced last week that he’ll be rejoining the Scarlets next summer, declining to take up his option of a third year at Clermont. It’s not surprise. Davies has made just 16 starts for the Auvergne club in 15 months, his opportunities restricted by a serious knee injury and competition for places in a squad containing Wesley Fofana, Benson Stanley and Aurelien Rougerie.Davies joins a long list of British and Irish players who discovered that the Top 14 wasn’t to their taste. One of the first was former Wales fly-half Arwel Thomas, who famously complained of his short-lived spell at Pau in 2003, that “shops don’t open maybe at 9am, so you have to plan your breakfasts a bit better”.Homesick: Jonny Sexton was open in saying he was homesickSince then a starting XV of stars have fled France for various reasons, from Riki Flutey to Olly Barkley to Gethin Jenkins to Jim Hamilton. Not forgetting, of course, the triumvirate of Dan Lydiate, Jonathan Sexton and Jamie Roberts, none of whom flourished at Racing 92.But why is it that so many talented players are unable to reproduce in France the rugby that prompted a Top 14 club to come calling?The style of rugby is a factor but in most cases it’s what happens off the pitch that’s decisive. The first point to make is while these men are elite athletes they are still human beings, subject to the same emotions as the rest of us. Some people are self-sufficient and adaptable, others need to be surrounded by the familiar, be it a face or a place. Some are stimulated by a new environment, others shrink from it.Jonathan Sexton never made any secret of the fact he was homesick in Paris. Frequent returns to Dublin on international duty didn’t help the fly-half settle; if anything it exacerbated his feeling of isolation, reminding him of what he was missing. The same went for Wales flanker Dan Lydiate.Growing pains: Julian Depuy said he found it a struggle at LeicesterIt’s a different psychology for the dozens of Aussies, South Africans and Pacific Islanders in France. They are thousands of miles from their homes with none of the tempting opportunities to nip back to see family and friends on a free weekend . Additionally, when they arrive in France, it’s not just for the rugby but also for the life experience. After all, they’re not only in a different country but a different continent, one they may never return to after the playing days are over. So they are determined to get the most they can from France, sportingly and culturally.Sexton had his wife with him in Paris but many players – like Davies at Clermont – arrive in France alone. That’s a daunting challenge for anyone, as Julien Dupuy explained last week in an interview with Midi Olympique. The Stade Francais scrum-half joined Leicester in 2008 as a raw 24-year-old and though he was a success on the field, off it he struggled in his alien surroundings. Short stay: Jonathan Davies has headed back to Wales and not chosen to extend his Clermont contract With Jonathan Davies the latest big-name star to confirm he is coming home, RW ponders why so many struggle to settle in Francecenter_img You can choose to have the whole experience and get the very best out of it or you decide to go there and hang in. Some people have gone there and not enjoyed it because they haven’t understood what was needed on the field.”Wilkinson made those comments in 2011, in response to the news that another superstar was on his way to Toulon. It was Gavin Henson, and he lasted barely four months. To quote Arwel Thomas: “It takes a certain type of person to go out there to France and be successful.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Six French stars of the future

first_imgTower of strength: Paul Jedrasiak has been at the heart of Clermont’s Top 14 pushCamille ChatNicknamed ‘Le Felin’ [‘Chat’ is French for cat], the young Racing hooker has only just turned 20 but already he is being talked of as the next great France hooker. A youth kick-boxing champion, Chat made the most of his chances when Dimitri Szarzewski was away on World Cup duty at the start of the season. With the return of the Szarzewski, Chat is now challenging the veteran for the starting jersey having matured so much in the last few months. At 5ft 10 and 15 and a half stone, Chat is still some years from his physical peak but he is already fearsomely strong and freakishly agile, which makes him a handful in the loose and at the set-piece.Fast-learner: Camille Chat has impressed for Racing 92 in recent weeksSébastien BézyBorn in the Paris region, Bezy played representative rugby alongside Jules Plisson in his youth, and one of his most vivid memories is cheering on Biarritz at the Stade de France when they thrashed Toulouse 40-13 in the 2006 Top 14 final. Within a short time his family moved south and Sébastien and his elder brother, Nicolas, joined Toulouse. Nicolas has since moved to Brive but Seb has established himself this season as Toulouse’s first-choice scrum-half ahead of Jean-Marc Doussain. Similar in style to Clermont’s Morgan Parra, Bezy’s goal-kicking has a slick pass, an eye for the smallest of gaps and a reliable goal-kicking boot. Like Parra he’s on the slight side, standing 5ft 7in and weighing 11 1/2 stone, leading him to joke: “I have the size of a Kenyan [runner].” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Dancing feet: Jonathan Danty’s agility belie his powerful frame Guy Noves has named his first training squad ahead of next month’s Six Nations, and among the familiar faces are several young players unblooded at Test level. We profile six possible stars of the future.Yacouba CamaraAt 21, the Toulouse flanker is the second youngest member of the group called up by Noves after Camille Chat but it came as no surprise when his name was read out. Camara was born in Aubervillers, a northern suburb of Paris, and he began his career at Massy, also the formative club of Mathieu Bastareaud. His talent was soon spotted by Toulouse and he arrived in the Pink City in 2013, scoring his first senior try in only his fourth match. The following year he was called into the France squad by Philippe Saint-Andre, and though not capped it was another important part of his rugby education. A strong line-out jumper with the pace and hands of a threequarter, the 6ft 4in Camara has bulked up at Toulouse and uses his 17 stone to devastating effect in defence.Power-packed: Yacouba Camara brings explosivity to the French backrowJefferson PoirotIdentified back in 2014 by Rugby World as a future Bleu, Poirot has continued to develop under the tutelage of Raphael Ibanez and Joe Worsley at Bordeaux. But it’s the presence of the veteran prop Jean-Baptiste Poux that has shored up the 23-year-old’s set-piece work and turned him into the complete loose-head. At 5ft 11 and 19 stone Poirot shares the same explosive power and ball-winning ability at the breakdown as Eddy Ben Arous. the man with whom he’ll be competing for the No1 jersey. Poirot, whose Nigerian father came to Europe to work in the NHS in England, learned his rugby in the Dordogne and began his professional career with Brive before moving to Bordeaux in 2012.Coal face: Bordeaux’s Jefferson Poirot will give Eddy Ben Arous competitionJonathan DantyThere was widespread bafflement in France when Jonathan Danty was overlooked by Philippe Saint-Andre for France’s World Cup squad. Outstanding as Stade Francais won their first Top 14 title for eight years, the 23-year-old Danty was voted by Midi Olymipque their top centre of the season. He’s been compared in some quarters to Matheiu Bastareaud but that does Danty a disservice; he’s quicker, has better hands and possesses sharper vision. Plus he’s only 16 and a half stone compared to the 18 and a half stone of the Toulon centre.center_img Guy Noves has announced his 30-man training squad for the Six Nations with a clutch of little-known young players. Could these be the stars of the future? Midfield maestro: Danty shone in last year’s Top 14 finalPaul JedraziakWith a maternal Italian grandmother, the 23-year-old Jedriaziak attributes his towering 6ft 5in frame to copious plates of his mother’s pasta growing up. But it was his father, Jean-Pierre, who coaxed his son away from basketball and towards rugby, a sport he soon mastered. A natural leader, Jedriaziak captained France U19s and U20s and earned high praise from the coach of the latter. “He’s got the vision and stamina of a back-row forward but with the power of a second-row,” said Fabien Pelous. Jedriaziak made his senior debut for Clermont in the 2013-14 season and has a maturity and humility that befits a practising Christian.last_img read more

Experiments in love: liturgies as cultural expressions

first_imgExperiments in love: liturgies as cultural expressions Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Identical twin brothers Raul and Guillermo Renederos and friends celebrate their “Los Cumpleañeros” a few years ago at San Andres Church in Yonkers, New York. Photo/San Andres Church[Episcopal News Service] When identical twin brothers asked the Rev. Yamily Bass-Choate for a quinceañera-like ceremony for themselves a few years ago, a new liturgy, “Los Cumpleañeros,” was born.With the twins’ input, Bass-Choate created a male version of the Latin American culture’s coming-of-age celebration for girls reaching their 15th birthday. After the 16th-birthday celebration for Raul and Guillermo Renderos, the new rite caught on quickly with teen-aged boys at San Andres Church in Yonkers, New York, she said.“They want to be blessed going into the world, just like the girls,” Bass-Choate said during a June 18 telephone interview from her office.“They come and talk to me. It’s a beautiful ceremony. We select the music, and the readings and there’s a big party afterwards; the teenagers love it.“I think that’s what liturgy is all about, to glorify God in a way that is honoring our ancestors as we go forward in the Episcopal Church,” she said. “It tells them that, with us, they are who they are.”Elsewhere, other communities of faith also are expressing culture and identity through creative approaches to liturgy.An African processional offering in CaliforniaAt least one Sunday a month ushers at Holy Faith Church in Inglewood, California, leave the collection plates at the front of the church and line up with other parishioners in the back.They call what happens next the African processional offering and the whole body is involved. Drums are playing; the choirs are playing musical instruments.“It starts in the back of the church. Some people take their pledge envelopes. Some take cash, whatever they have, and they process to the altar. They keep singing and dancing and worshiping,” said Patricia Amadi, a long-time church member.“Back home in Nigeria we do it as a thanksgiving or a ceremonial service, when people bring a lot with them to church from their farm crops,” she added. “They go to the front and say, ‘this is what I’ve brought to you, what came from my garden, my house, to give to the glory of God.’”It is one way the congregation — whose members are African American, Latino, and Anglo as well as hailing from various African, Caribbean and Central American countries — expresses its diversity, said the Rev. Altagracia Perez, rector.“We’ve tried making consistent changes in the liturgy that reflect the variety of the cultures here” including bilingual services and experimenting with a range of music, from classical to reggae or jazz, even youth or intergenerational culture, she said during a recent telephone interview from her office.On a recent Sunday that coincided with the 20th anniversary of the civil disturbance in Los Angeles, the youth created a tableaux inspired by the Rev. Martin Luther King’s sermon “Experiment in Love” about nonviolence.The tableaux-as-sermon depicted scenes of anger and violence, things being taken away, as well as forgiveness. The congregation was given an opportunity to reflect and respond but “it threw off some visitors,” Perez said. “They expected something else and walked out.”But Amadi likes the liturgical change-up when “it incorporates a little bit of how other countries worship,” especially the African processional, she said.“I like it because sometimes people come to church and they’re not so much involved. But once you start playing the music, and praising and working your way up the altar, you just see them getting involved.”Hawaiian song: ‘responding to the people of this land and sea’Epiphany Church in Kaimuki and St. Andrew’s Cathedral are among the Honolulu congregations incorporating Ke Aoha A Ke Akua, a song written by Queen Lili’uokalani and known as the Queen’s Prayer, into weekly worship.Sung in Hawaiian after the confession and before the absolution, it was composed during by the queen during her imprisonment at Iolani Palace by the Missionary party that overthrew the Hawaiian government, according to an explanation in Epiphany’s bulletin.“She was referring to the illegal overthrow of the Hawaiian monarchy by U.S. business interests backed by the U.S. government,” according to the bulletin. “The values in her prayer of forgiveness, love, faith and hope exemplify the twin influences of ancient Hawaiian spirituality and Christian ethics through her Episcopal faith.”For the Rev. Malcolm Chun, who serves at Church of the Holy Nativity in Honolulu, “it’s a good step, a very tiny baby step,” but adapting liturgies to local culture needs to go further.Worshipping in the Hawaiian language is important “so people realize this is a whole service that responds to the people of this land and sea,” said Chun during a June 20 telephone interview.“Many people have said, ‘I don’t understand the language but I love to hear it,’ … and that’s what it takes to change people,” added Chun, who holds a doctorate in indigenous studies and has written several books on Hawaiian culture.He believes it will help evangelize and spread the message “that you have a host culture … that you are among people who have something to contribute but they don’t do it the way you do it. They need to be recognized because that’s one of the tenets of our church, to welcome the stranger.”Without inculturated liturgies, he said, “people who are curious about the Episcopal Church come, sit in the back pew and you never see them again.” In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cindi Bartol says: Rector Smithfield, NC Nathaniel Queen says: Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments (4) Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN The Rev. Martini Shaw, rector of the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas in Philadelphia extends an invitation to Christian discipleship during worship. Photo/St. Thomas’ ChurchPhiladelphia: ‘opening the doors of the church’Some denominations describe it as an altar call but the Rev. Martini Shaw says it’s an invitation to Christian discipleship and he extends it every Sunday after he preaches at the African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas in Philadelphia.The practice originated with the 19th century evangelical movement, but Shaw, rector of the historically African American congregation for about nine years, said he incorporated it weekly when perplexed visitors couldn’t figure out how to join the church.“When you go to the Baptist, the African Methodist Episcopal, the Methodist Church, there’s an opportunity within the liturgy to come forward and join. The question was often asked of me how does a person join this church, there is no opportunity for a person publicly to profess their faith and join when he or she may have been moved by Scripture or the preached word or some musical expression,” he recalled during a recent telephone interview.It’s “opening the doors of the church,” Shaw said. “It’s simply an invitation to anyone who is present who either wants a closer relationship with Christ or who doesn’t belong to a church to come forward.”So far this year at least 50 people have accepted the invitation. When they come forward, Shaw inquires about their intention to join the faith community; vestry representatives meet with them, record personal information and even take a photo, which is placed on a new member bulletin board.“They start new member classes and each person is assigned a shepherd to help their transition within the life of the church,” added Shaw. “If he or she is not baptized, or if they haven’t been confirmed, we prepare them for both.”St. Thomas, founded by the Rev. Absalom Jones, the Episcopal Church’s first African American priest, is “an Anglocatholic, charismatic and Afrocentric” community with an average Sunday attendance of about 300, Shaw said.“For us it’s a glorious time,” he added. “Usually when the person comes forward they are met with great applause by the congregation and usually several other people will come forward and stand with that person or persons.”Los Angeles: floral and final tributes and kabuki dancesFuneral services at St. Mary’s Church, a historically Japanese American congregation in Los Angeles, include two separate ways to pay respects; a floral tribute on behalf of church groups and another final tribute for everyone attending.Carolyn Morinishi has done both; often representing the Women of St. Mary’s she approaches the casket or urn after prayers for the deceased are offered. She reverences and places a flower on or beside it, reverences again, and then bows to grieving family members before returning to her seat.The tradition is similar to those she has seen at other Japanese American and even Buddhist funerals. “I just went to a Buddhist funeral this past Saturday and they did the same thing,” she said during a June 20 telephone interview. “At that funeral, it was done with incense and they called it an incense offering. They approach the incense pot, take a pinch and place it in the incense burner, then bow to the family.“They do it with incense, we do it with flowers,” she said.The other opportunity happens after the dismissal, as each person approaches the casket or urn, and in turn, bows to it and then to family members before greeting them on the way out of the church.Funeral services may also include an offering from St. Mary’s Kotobuki Kai dancers, whose simple, smooth and graceful movements were adapted for church audiences from classical Japanese kabuki dance-theatre.Morinishi, 52, began dancing at the church at age nine and now teaches under the professional name Kikusue Azuma, but said until recently that she didn’t think of it as liturgical dance. “It was just nice Japanese dance in church,” she said.When the Rev. Anna Olson was installed as rector a few months ago, Morinishi and other dancers interpreted “Here I Am, Lord” during the celebration. Wearing traditional Japanese kimonos they matched movement to music in soulful, expressive ways. A lot happens in the head and hand movements, Morinishi said.The performance included a subtext, as a four-year-old and two older girls danced before the altar. “Their movements indicated them teaching her, to illustrate the ‘let’s go serve’ theme of the song,” Morinishi said. Two older dancers illustrated the ‘finest bread I will provide’ lyrics in the second verse, executing hand over hand motions, graceful turns and pointing to the cross behind the altar.When dancing “I feel happiness and joy inside that comes out through your face and fingers,” Morinishi said. “When I dance, I feel this joy inside of me and it’s hard to hide.”‘Smudging’ and incense in MinnesotaThe Rev. Robert Two Bulls, vicar of the All Saints Episcopal Indian Mission in Minneapolis, said he uses smoldering sage and sweetgrass as incense during worship in the traditional Native American practice known as “smudging.”“It’s the same thing as censing. During our Eucharist when I’m getting ready to set the table is when I’ll usually smudge the elements and if I’m using inculturated liturgies I’ll have people smudge themselves with the sage and sweetgrass,” he said.But he said that some elders “just want the plain liturgy out of the prayer book because they were taught to keep everything separate. That the traditional practices should be kept separate from what we do in church.”But, he added, “To me, at the end of the day it’s all worshipping God. You use whatever it is to express that and I don’t think God would separate it all out.”Ultimately, though, melding culture and liturgy can be a starting place, an open door into the church, he said.“They’re all aids in worshiping God, our liturgy, our practices, and I think a lot of people right now that are disconnected from a lot of traditions are seeking some kind of connection,” he said. “And if we as a church can offer that, that’s good.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent with the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rhonda Muir says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET June 27, 2012 at 8:32 am “Enculturation” is the hallmark and the strength of our Anglican liturgical heritage. What a wonderful article! It gives me hope to know that there are such wonderful experiences of worship being created thoughtfully in contexts where they are needed. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing June 26, 2012 at 6:15 pm What a wonderful article to have before us particularly as many prepare to attend General Convention – a gathering that includes and welcomes people from each of these indigenous places. While some geographical places have larger populations of one/some of the groups, we ALL have the potential to search out and invite in to our sacred spaces people from each of these groups – people of all cultures are all around us – seek and ye shall find…and then, be open to all that may transpire – Rector Shreveport, LA By Pat McCaughanPosted Jun 26, 2012 June 26, 2012 at 6:24 pm Something about these ethno-centric rites being incorporated into our liturgy that touches me dearly. Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA June 28, 2012 at 1:00 pm Yet more examples of the kind of celebrations of who we are and wish to become that should be the real point of the lament at general convention! TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments are closed. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Marie Alford-Harkey says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR last_img read more

Philip Mounstephen named Church Mission Society’s executive leader

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Posted Jul 2, 2012 Philip Mounstephen named Church Mission Society’s executive leader Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls The Rev. Philip Mounstephen. Photo/CMS[Church Mission Society] International chaplain the Rev Philip Mounstephen to lead mission community with passion for the world to know Jesus.Philip takes up the post of CMS executive leader after five years as chaplain of St Michael’s, Paris, a large multicultural church in the centre of the city. Here he has gained a reputation as a passionate and visionary leader who encourages and enables others to grow.He described himself as “thrilled and delighted” to have been asked to lead the CMS community in mission.“I look forward to working in life-changing mission with partners the world over who share our abiding passion – that the world would know Jesus Christ,” he said.Philip is deeply committed to the church around the world. At St Michael’s he has seen significant success in building up a church community including French-, English- and Tamil-speaking congregations made up of over 40 nationalities. He has developed the church’s international connections in Africa and Asia and acted as consultant and companion to a Turkish-language church in Istanbul.John Ripley, the Chair of CMS trustees, said that Philip emerged from a highly talented field of candidates as “a very strong communicator and influencer who we are confident will inspire the whole CMS community and engage all sorts of new audiences.”Philip with wife Ruth and daughter KittyPhilip succeeds the Rt Rev Tim Dakin, who is now Bishop of Winchester. He is expected to start work with CMS during October when he will meet colleagues from the collaborative international network made up of CMS, CMS Africa, AsiaCMS and New Zealand CMS.Philip’s past experience also includes a variety of positions at CPAS, including Acting General Director, and leading a multicultural church in Streatham, south London.He is very much a ‘people person’ and his current role brings him into regular contact with everyone from the homeless to ambassadors. He is married to Ruth and father to 20-year-old Kitty. Among his many and varied interests are history, collecting vinyl records and supporting Newcastle United. Featured Events Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis People Anglican Communion, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

Church responses to government shutdown bear unexpected fruits

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Members of St. Paul’s, a small Episcopal church in Vernal, Utah, invited furloughed workers to eat for free at a community lunch it hosted on Oct. 6. The lunch was so successful, community members are looking for ways to make it a regular Sunday event in town. Photo: Rachael Gordon[Episcopal News Service] This Sunday, champagne is on the menu at Christ Episcopal Church in Alexandria, Virginia.At the initiation of Ken Knapp, a government contractor, and his wife Nancy, an IRS lawyer in the Treasury Department, the church held two Sunday gatherings for people affected by the 16-day government shutdown that ended Oct. 18. They shared food, feelings about the shutdown and resources for coping. On Oct. 20, they’ll meet for a last supper – at least for now.“We’re having a closing session with them this Sunday,” Nancy Knapp said. “We promised champagne along with the meal. I’ll be very curious to see what happens with this group. At least one gentleman asked if there was any interest in extending the group for people who were out of work. I think there’ll be some ongoing dialogue about that.”Christ Church was among Episcopal churches across the country who reached out to those affected by the shutdown. Some experienced unexpected results from those ministry initiatives, from increased volunteering to a greater awareness of feeding ministries.“This is my fourth shutdown,” said Nancy Knapp, who recalled being “younger and scared” during the others during the 1990s, one of which lasted three weeks. “Now, I’m 55. As a manager, I had to send people home. … I actually felt some guilt in that, because I was one of the few who was asked to stay behind, at least initially.” Ultimately, she was out of work seven days. Her husband continued to work throughout the shutdown.But that wasn’t true for some other members of the church, located across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C. Probably 20 to 30 percent of members work for the government or a government contractor, Ken Knapp said.About 18 people attended the first Sunday-afternoon meeting, 15 the second.“It’s a ministry of presence and prayer and sharing and listening, really,” Nancy Knapp said. “It was really sitting around the table, having a meal together. We let them know that it was a safe place for conversation, that whatever happened there, stayed there.”Through the meetings, participants could share resources and ideas. Had the shutdown gone on longer, they would have sent meals home with those who needed them, she said.The first week, participants “talked a lot about feelings and coping mechanisms,” she said. “We talked about taking care of ourselves and ways we could do that.”That included spending time volunteering.“I introduced the concept of outreach to them and told them we could connect them to ministries,” Nancy Knapp said. Many subsequently volunteered for the church’s program making bag lunches for homeless people and for its Lazarus Ministry to the homeless.Said Ken Knapp, “The impact of this [shutdown] goes beyond the financial for a lot of people, and it goes to their sense of identity and their sense of purpose in life. So by redirecting those energies towards some sort of a mission or outreach project, you’re giving them back a sense of purpose … something to feel good about at the end of the day.”And, Nancy Knapp said, “it gave them a new perspective on the problem.” They learned about “the poor among us who depend on government services who were really much more hard-hit than we were.”In Grand Haven, Michigan, St. John’s Episcopal Church extended the hours of its food pantry and gave patrons to its twice-weekly feeding program access to the pantry’s infant supplies such as formula and diapers. They particularly were concerned that mothers have access to supplies if the local Women, Infants and Children program was forced to close, said the Rev. Jared Cramer, rector.During the first Loving Spoonfuls meal program after news was published about the extended services, the church administrator reported that “there were a lot of new faces that she hadn’t seen before,” he said.Beyond any individuals needing help during the shutdown, he said, “what it did wind up doing was providing a catalyst for people to know what our church does just every day, when there’s not a shutdown; that we’re a church that really cares about feeding and clothing and taking care of people, which is cool. We’re hoping that may be one good that will come out of this.”The meal program serves mostly low-income working people, he said, noting that it’s a need that can be invisible.“We do have some parishioners affected who are government workers, but not a lot,” he said. “Part of the difficulty, I think, is that the pain this creates in the lives of lower-income families is one that is hidden from society’s view. I grew up blue collar, and for a period of time my family relied on assistance from our church for groceries and needed items. However, like many families in our situation, we tried to be private about it. So, a lot of this pain is hard to see.”Besides alerting those who need them to the existence of the church’s programs, he said, he hopes the publicity and demonstration of need will bring in more volunteers for the programs, which are supported by donations.Before coming to St. John’s, Cramer was a clergy resident at Christ Church. Reflecting on the issue after the government shutdown ended, he said his time at the Alexandria church likely influenced his desire to do something because, after working in the Washington, D.C., area, he knew the shutdown affected “real people.” His first thought when the shutdown occurred was: What can the church offer to make a difference?At St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, a historic mission parish in Vernal, Utah, efforts to help furloughed workers dovetailed with a new feeding initiative. Using a $500 grant from the diocese, the church, which has an average Sunday attendance of 26, had obtained a temporary food permit and invited everyone in town, from those in the homeless shelter to local government officials to members of other churches, to come for a meal together outside the church Oct. 6. Those who needed it, ate free; others paid the cost or the meal or made a donation.“We had invited anybody who needed a meal to come to lunch,” said the Rev. Connie Gordon, vicar. “We put up signs at the food bank. We put up signs at the shelter and just said, ‘Come and eat.’”When the shutdown occurred, they issued a special invitation to furloughed workers to come for a free meal.“It took on a life of its own,” Gordon said. Young people attended church the next Sunday and asked, “When can we help this out again?” Other people asked the same question, with government officials suggesting county space to host regular Sunday lunches and offering to help St. Paul’s connect with other churches and organizations. Donations provided seed money for the next gathering.It was “not what I expected at all, this wonderful starting of something new and just a great response from the community,” she said. “It’s exciting what a little parish can do when you just sit down and say, ‘What can we do?’”Further west, in Bremerton, Washington, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church didn’t offer shutdown-specific services but did anticipate increased use of its feeding program and onsite low-income counseling center as the shutdown continued, said the Rev. Kathleen Kingslight, rector. The area contains several military installations, and people had been coming to the church for financial assistance, she said.“I just hope this changes. It’s scary,” she said in a telephone interview several days before the shutdown ended. “It’s scary. So many of the military live hand-to-mouth … if this goes on too long, the churches are going to be inundated.”In Atlanta, St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church, like Christ Church, offered a listening ministry Oct. 6 to parishioners affected by the shutdown.“We are deeply aware of the emotion swirling in our St. Bartholomew’s community in this time that our government is shut down. Many are directly impacted by this, and we want to offer a space to gather on Sunday morning to hear how you are affected by it,” the church said in an e-mail announcement.Back in Washington, D.C., diocesan Bishop Mariann Budde invited couples displaced by the shutdown to wed in the Bishop’s Garden at Washington National Cathedral. Cheryl Wilburn, associate for pastoral care and canonical acts, reported via e-mail Oct. 16 that she had 25 weddings scheduled from Oct. 5 to 30.“I think most have proceeded as planned,” she said. “Requests are a combination of those deferred from federal government property to a number who were scheduled for civil weddings at our local Superior Court. … Where folks have found officiants, I have offered them a place for the ceremony. Size has ranged from parties of three to 100.”Some other Episcopal churches followed Budde’s example, including Church of Our Saviour/La Iglesia de Nuestro Salvador, near Cincinnati in Mount Auburn, Ohio, according to the Religion News Service.Near Grand Teton National Park, St. John’s Episcopal Church in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, offered the community green in front of its main sanctuary for couples, although no one took it up on the offer, said Greer Freed, director of development and communication. The church also operates the Chapel of the Transfiguration, with a window view of Grand Teton, that closed during the shutdown.None of the weddings there had to be cancelled, Freed said. But the park shutdown did cause a headache, according to RNS: “Workmen who needed to winterize the building for the season had to outrun park rangers once the roads through the park to the chapel were locked down.”– Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Faith & Politics Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing By Sharon SheridanPosted Oct 18, 2013 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Church responses to government shutdown bear unexpected fruits Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

Rapidísimas

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Por Onell A. SotoPosted Oct 7, 2014 Rapidísimas Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cinco ciudadanos cubanos que habían entrado en México sin documentos protagonizaron  una lucha campal con los policías que trataban de deportarlos a Cuba en el aeropuerto de Chetumal. En el video se ve cuando los cubanos decían que “preferían morir” antes que regresar a la tierra que los vio nacer. Este no es el primer caso de esta naturaleza aunque sí la riña que se formó en la sala de espera.El grupo terrorista conocido como Boko Haram ha declarado “un estado islámico” en Gwoza, un municipio en el estado de Borno en el nordeste de Nigeria. Esto significa que esa región se regirá por las leyes islámicas que en muchos casos lleva a la pena de muerte para los que no se conviertan a la fe mahometana. Despachos de prensa informan que los habitantes de Gwoza están dispuestos a resistir hasta la muerte. Boko Haram ha invadido varios territorios aledaños, debido a la debilidad y falta de armamentos y entrenamiento del ejército nacional nigeriano.Ana María González prominente oncóloga colombiana ha sido sentenciada a 10 años de prisión por haber intentado envenenar a su amante y compañero  médico George Blumenschein. El fiscal pidió una pena de 30 años pero los jurados pensaron que esa pena era excesiva. Amigos y familiares defendieron a González diciendo que “era una persona de bien” y  dijeron que sus trabajos de investigación sobre el cáncer de mama constituían un verdadero paso de avance sobre esta enfermedad. Su padre llorando ante las cámaras dijo que “fue un error” pero que no merecía la pena que recibió.La violencia continúa en Venezuela. Su última víctima ha sido el sacerdote católico romano Reinaldo Herrera de la diócesis de la Guaira  que fue abatido a balazos en septiembre. Herrera era capellán militar en la Infantería de Marina de la Fuerza Armada Nacional y pertenecía al Ordinariato Militar. Su obispo, Raúl Biord Castillo, expresó su pesar por su asesinato  y dijo que “esta muerte se suma a tantas otras muertes producto de la violencia y del clima de inseguridad que vivimos”.Nicolás Maduro, presidente de Venezuela, ha sido criticado por los gastos incurridos en su viaje a Nueva York para hablar ante el pleno de las Naciones Unidas. Su comitiva llegó a 170 personas todas relacionadas con el chavismo. Sus gastos ascendieron a dos millones y medio de dólares, según informes periodísticos. Otros piensan que el gasto fue mucho mayor.El cardenal Pietro Parolín,  secretario de Estado del Vaticano, dijo en la reciente asamblea de las Naciones Unidas en Nueva York con respecto a la insurgencia islamista que “es lícito detener a un agresor injusto”. Añadió que “la amenaza transnacional” que suponen los yihadistas requiere de una acción conjunta de varias naciones que detenga la violencia de este grupo radical.Las manifestaciones “pro democracia” en Hong Kong continúan en aumento pese a la acción policial. Observadores políticos dicen que las manifestaciones sólo son comparables a las que tuvieron lugar en la plaza Tiananmen en 1989. Los manifestantes piden elecciones libres y mayores libertades civiles.La paz  es parte importante de la liturgia. Lástima que muchos la utilizan para conversaciones vanas. El propósito principal de la paz es dar y recibir el saludo del Señor resucitado quien trajo y todavía trae la bendición de su paz a sus discípulos.El canónigo Kenneth Kearon, secretario general  de la Comunión Anglicana desde el 2004 ha sido electo obispo en la Iglesia de Irlanda. Servirá en la diócesis de Limerick y Killaloe. “Estoy muy contento en servir en esa diócesis y espero conocer mejor a sus laicos y clérigos”, dijo desde su oficina en Londres. Enhorabuena.Bárbara Frey, esposa del obispo William Frey que sirvió en Costa Rica, Guatemala y Colorado por varios años, falleció el 1 de octubre tras larga enfermedad. En paz descanse la amable señora.VERDAD.  La paz es fruto de la justicia. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more

‘Action’ call as 26 refugees drown off Greece

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Refugees Migration & Resettlement Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Anglican Communion, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Press Release Service Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Refugees arriving on the shore at the lighthouse on the Greek island of Lesbos. Photo: Max McClellan/United Society[Anglican Communion News Service] Ten children are amongst 26 Kurdish refugees from Iraq who have been confirmed to have drowned off the coast of Samos Island in Greece yesterday, the Anglican mission agency United Society (formerly USPG) say.The 26 dead – including five boys and five girls – are amongst more than 200 who have drowned so far this year as they attempted to cross from Turkey. Despite the winter weather and dangerous seas, refugees are continuing to make the perilous journey to the Greek islands in their thousands.“For those refugees who arrive safely, the medical issues are numerous,” the United Society’s Max McClellan, who is in Greece assisting the Diocese in Europe and ecumenical partners as they respond to the crisis, said. “Beside routine maladies and medical conditions, the refugees suffer from conditions brought on by their arduous journeys and cramped living conditions, like scabies.”The Anglican Chaplaincy in Greece, in partnership with United Society is supporting the work of the Greek medical organisation Medical Intervention (MedIn) on the island of Samos. Together, they are providing medical help, with the church also helping to pay for medicine, soap, blankets and sleeping bags. MedIn also provides baby milk to those with young infants.“Urgent action to support refugees is vital,” Max McClellan said. “While countries disagree over their responsibilities and their response, refugees are dying.“As was noted during a joint statement issued by the World Council of Churches and the UN: ‘It is of urgent importance that safe and legal passage for refugees coming to Europe be expanded and facilitated. Closing national borders to refugees is not a solution because it only shifts the responsibility to the next country.’”He said: “Our thoughts and prayers are with those who lost family members off the coast of Samos yesterday.”The United Society’s director of global relations, Rachel Parry, added: “This tragic accident serves to further underline the shocking situations that are forcing people to make these inherently risky journeys. Desperate families choose to travel to Europe knowing the risks, but they have no other option.“While governments are depriving refugee families of assets and closing borders, the loss of these Kurdish lives is yet another appalling tragedy; may it be a reminder that motivates governments into action, rather than falling on closed minds, cold hearts and unmoving policies.“Change must happen, and happen fast.”Click here to read more about how the United Society and Diocese in Europe are responding to the refugee crisis. Posted Jan 29, 2016 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL ‘Action’ call as 26 refugees drown off Greecelast_img read more

Le ministère Breaking Bread en Iowa allie sacré et profane

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Greg Mazunik joue de la guitare lors d’une réunion de Breaking Bread dans une pizzeria. Photo : Breaking Bread[Episcopal News Service] Il y a quelques semaines à la Foire de l’Iowa, non loin des hot-dogs, des attractions foraines et de la grande roue, la Révérende Lydia Bucklin a baptisé ses deux jeunes enfants, à l’ombre d’un arbre alors que des passants rejoignaient le groupe et que d’autres regardaient avec étonnement. Cet événement était le dernier en date d’une série de réunions mensuelles du Breaking Bread Ministry [Ministère du partage du pain], un groupe qui a démarré en octobre 2015 dans un bar des environs de Des Moines.Lydia Bucklin, missionnaire auprès des jeunes adultes pour le Diocèse épiscopal de l’Iowa, a démarré ce groupe avec Lizzie Gilman et Zebulun Treloar-Reid, à la suite d’une conversation lors d’une retraite. Lizzie Gilman a un ami venait d’ouvrir une brasserie et ils ont tous pensé que ce serait un bon moyen pour que les jeunes adultes « fassent l’expérience de l’Eucharistie dans le monde » comme le décrit Lydia Bucklin.Avec l’autorisation de l’Évêque de l’Iowa Alan Scarfe, Lydia Bucklin a commencé à préparer une liturgie pour un service sacré dans un monde profane. Elle a ensuite élaboré un programme pour l’extérieur qui ressemble à un service eucharistique normal à quelques exceptions près : pas de sermon traditionnel, ni de proclamation du Symbole de Nicée ou de confession des pêchés. Au lieu de cela, il y a deux lectures provenant de diverses sources, telles des poésies, des méditations ou des extraits de livres.Lorsque les gens arrivent pour un service de Breaking Bread, chacun reçoit un bulletin avec la partie de la liturgie qu’ils devront lire, surlignée. Un bénévole vient parfois avec une guitare pour diriger la musique, d’autres fois il y a des chants d’hymnes plus traditionnels.« Je ne fais pas grand chose d’autre si ce n’est présider à la table » confie Lydia Bucklin. « Cela aide à promouvoir l’idée que nous sommes tous appeler à faire le travail de Dieu. Nous tous ».Mais l’aspect le plus intéressant du service est ce que Lydia Bucklin appelle « la question clé ». Le groupe forme un cercle, la disposition préférée pour le service, et quelqu’un lit une question choisie à l’avance sur un sujet spirituel d’ordre général, puis d’en suit une pratique d’écoute intentionnelle alors que les participants partagent leurs récits personnels.La Révérende Lydia Bucklin se prépare à baptiser son fils Corson (à droite de la table) et sa fille Isla (en maillot de bain rose) à la Foire de l’Iowa. Photo : Breaking Bread« Je continue de suivre le Livre de la prière commune » explique Lydia Bucklin. « Nous ne récitons peut-être pas le Symbole de Nicèe ou la confession des péchés mais nous pouvons néanmoins avoir des conversations au sujet du péché ou au sujet des aspects importants de notre foi et ce qui n’est pas négociable. Ou nous pouvons parler de ce qui nous pose des difficultés ».Lydia Bucklin ajoute que l’environnement invite les gens à s’ouvrir. Et il y a eu des participants qui ont parlé de dépression, de toxicomanie et d’arrestations.À la suite d’une Eucharistie au cours de laquelle chacun donne la communion à son voisin, le service se termine par une pratique du Kaleidoscope Institute d’Eric Law où il est demandé à chacun de compléter la phrase suivante : « Aujourd’hui je demande à Dieu de [xxxxxxxxxx] et aujourd’hui je remercie Dieu pour [xxxxxxxxx] ». Puis le groupe continue les conversations autour d’un repas.Depuis la première réunion il y a presque un an, le groupe compte un noyau fidèle d’environ six à huit personnes, en sus des 10 à 15 personnes qui peuvent se présenter dans chaque endroit à une heure donnée. Outre la brasserie et la foire, des services se sont déroulés dans un parc, une pizzeria et même chez la co-fondatrice de Breaking Bread, Lizzie Gilman.Lizzie Gilman est mère au foyer de deux petites filles et elle ne sait que trop combien il est parfois difficile pour de jeunes familles d’aller à l’église le dimanche matin.« Les temps ont changé et le dimanche matin ne convient pas à certaines familles ou aux célibataires. Que les gens fassent du sport ou qu’ils aient de jeunes enfants ou peut-être qu’ils veuillent juste dormir un peu plus longtemps – quelle que soit la raison – le dimanche matin ne semblait pas aller pour les jeunes adultes » explique Lizzie Gilman. « Alors nous avons réfléchi à ce que font les gens. Et bien ils sortent après le travail. Il est facile de refuser le dimanche matin mais lorsque quelqu’un vous offre un dîner et une bière, il est possible que vous ayez envie d’essayer  ».Pour Lizzie Gilman, apporter le ministère aux gens à l’extérieur de l’église est la plus grande source d’inspiration pour Breaking Bread. « Je pense qu’il est important que l’église voie à quel point l’esprit fait des merveilles lorsque nous nous réunissons hors des murs de l’église » continue-t-elle. « Nous nous réunissons un jour différent ou dans un endroit différent, mais nous célébrons la même Eucharistie. Le fait de simplement ressentir ce caractère sacré, partout où vous allez, est un sentiment puissant. C’est comme aller à un grand diner où vous ne connaissez personne et faire simplement confiance à l’Esprit Saint pour passer un merveilleux moment  ».« Il y a beaucoup de gens qui sont venus qui ne seraient jamais entrés dans une église. Plusieurs d’entre eux nous l’ont dit » ajoute Lydia Bucklin. Elle donne l’exemple d’un jardinier d’une église qui a admis n’avoir jamais assisté au service à l’intérieur parce qu’il savait qu’il n’avait pas assez d’argent à mettre dans la corbeille pour la quête. Lorsqu’il a découvert qu’on se réunissait dans un parc, il a assisté au service parce qu’il s’est senti plus à l’aise.Lydia Bucklin souligne à chaque service qu’il n’y a pas d’obligation de rejoindre une église ou d’en être membre. Et compte tenu que les frais généraux pour tenir un service sont faibles, on ne demande pas de dons. « Nous n’avons pas besoin d’un beau bâtiment ni d’une tonne d’approvisionnements » déclare-t-elle. « Je prends un simple sac fourre-tout où je place le calice, la patène et quelques vêtements. D’autres apportent le pain et le vin. Lorsque nous étions à la foire, nous avons utilisé le dessous du pain d’un sandwich au porc ».Cette combinaison d’un environnement décontracté et d’un service eucharistique plein d’intentions personnelles est ce qui fait que Breaking Bread est spécial et que cela permet des interactions uniques.L’un des moments les plus mémorables pour Lydia Bucklin fut lors d’un service du Mercredi des cendres à la pizzeria du quartier. Lizzie Gilman invita le personnel de cuisine et de service en salle à participer et trois personnes sont venues les larmes aux yeux pour participer au service. Après avoir placé les cendres sur le front d’une serveuse fortement tatouée nommée Angel, la fille de Lydia Bucklin a interpelé sa mère en disant « Maman, je ne veux pas être réduite en poussière ». Sans perdre une seconde, Angel a répondu « Mais ma chérie, ne sais-tu pas que les plus belles étoiles sont faites de poussière, tout comme toi et moi ? Tu es une étoile étincelante ».« C’est dans l’un de ces moments que l’on réalise pourquoi l’on fait ce que l’on fait » explique Lydia Bucklin.Pour Zebulun Treloar-Reid, co-fondateur de Breaking Bread et récemment diplômé du séminaire, l’un des aspects les plus importants du ministère est qu’il est plus large qu’une congrégation. « Il est plus axé sur l’idée de rassembler des gens de toute la région métropolitaine plutôt qu’une seule congrégation ». « Il s’agit d’introduire le sacré dans les espaces profanes de façon à ce que nous puissions commencer à effacer les différences entre le sacré et le séculier ».Zebulun Treloar-Reid, transsexuel âgé de 27 ans, apprécie également que le groupe soit ouvert et disponible à la communauté LGBTQ. En tant que tel, Lydia Bucklin s’est efforcée de créer une liturgie qui ne comporte pas de langage sexospécifique, en éliminant toute référence à Dieu avec des pronoms masculins ou comme père, ainsi que d’autres ajustements.« Je n’ai personnellement jamais eu de problème avec l’utilisation de pronoms masculins pour Dieu car je n’ai jamais vraiment pensé à Dieu comme étant physiquement un homme » explique Zebulun Treloar-Reid. « Mais je pense qu’il est important de rappeler aux gens que Dieu ne fait pas partie du patriarcat. Je pense que si nous employons trop un langage masculin, nous pouvons commencer à trop glorifier la personne de sexe masculin et je pense que c’est dangereux.« J’apprécie d’avoir des endroits où nous parlons de Dieu dans une perspective plus large car finalement Dieu n’a pas de sexe ».Rachael Essing, bénévole de l’Episcopal Service Corps âgée de 22 ans, en convient. « Les mots de liturgie que nous utilisons ne sont pas binaires et ne sont pas totalement masculins non plus, ce que moi, en tant que jeune femme, j’apprécie vraiment ».« J’aime la tradition donc j’aime avoir des choses sur lesquelles me concentrer et savoir d’où elles viennent » ajoute Rachael Essing, « mais j’aime aussi tirer des informations de nouvelles sources car il y a beaucoup d’informations qui sont disponibles et qui peut-être correspondent mieux à quelqu’un d’autre. Cela nous ouvre sur le monde où l’on peut connecter ».Au cours de sa brève existence, la formule de Breaking Bread a déjà commencé à se répandre dans les diocèses voisins qui le soumettent à des essais.« C’est une formule qui est facile à adopter et à faire vôtre et que l’on peut réaliser n’importe où » déclare Lydia Bucklin. « L’idée était de l’avoir dans un grand nombre de lieux différents pour exprimer que le sacré est tout autour de nous. Nous pouvons trouver le divin dans des choses ordinaires et chez des gens ordinaires ».– Luc Blount est journaliste indépendant basé à Durham en Caroline du Nord. Featured Jobs & Calls de Luke BlountPosted Sep 8, 2016 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Le ministère Breaking Bread en Iowa allie sacré et profane Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET last_img read more

South Asian Anglicans receive culturally sensitive theological training

first_img Rector Collierville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Anglican Communion News Service] Clergy and lay leaders from Anglican churches in South Asia are taking part in a pioneering program designed to increase culturally sensitive theological training. Modelled on the Ecumenical Institute at the Château de Bossey near Geneva, in Switzerland, the Asian Theological Academy  was created to help Asian Christians think together about theological issues in a local context. “This is a chance to explore different ways of thinking,” Dr Rienzie Perera, the founder and director of the ATA said. “It is about interaction. Yes, we live in Asia, but there is [currently] no cross-fertilisation between us.”“This is a chance to explore different ways of thinking,” said, Rienzie Perera, the founder and director of the ATA. “It is about interaction. Yes, we live in Asia, but there is [currently] no cross-fertilisation between us.”Full article. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books South Asian Anglicans receive culturally sensitive theological training Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Posted Nov 18, 2016 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Theological Education Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Anglican Communion, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Asia, last_img read more

Sleeping pods to be installed in Welsh churches for SpiritCymru…

first_img [Anglican Communion News Service] Special sleeping pods will be installed in a number of remote churches and chapels in Wales for use by cycling tourists. The SpiritCymru project is the brainchild of Ceredigion businessman James Lynch, who runs a sustainable holiday company. It is being launched as part of the Welsh Government’s Year of Discovery tourism campaign. The Church in Wales said that the scheme will “bring valuable support to struggling – even closed – rural churches by opening them up as accommodation for touring cyclists.”Read the entire article here. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Tags Sleeping pods to be installed in Welsh churches for SpiritCymru cycle tourism campaign Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Anglican Communion Posted Jan 25, 2019 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Events Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more