BanKo Perlas sinks PayMaya; Petro Gazz triumphs with new import

first_imgVolcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Lakia Bright scored five of her 25 points in the fifth set as the Perlas Spikers broke a four-game losing streak and moved out of the bottom rung of the standings with a 2-4 card.“It was my teammates actually; I started out slow but my teammates motivated me and never gave up on me,” Bright said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownIt was a sorry defeat for the High Flyers, who appeared on their way to easy win, leading two sets and 11-8 in the third.Earlier, Petro Gazz scored its second straight win after a 25-22, 30-28, 25-13 triumph over Iriga-Navy. In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Dave Chappelle donates P1 million to Taal relief operations Filipino vs Filipino Ukrainian Olena Lymareva-Flink, who arrived in the country just two days ago, hit the ground running, scoring 16 points to lift the Angels, who lost Kadi Kullerkann due to an injured ACL.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Winfrey details her decision to withdraw from Simmons film China population now over 1.4 billion as birthrate falls Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player awardcenter_img Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours LATEST STORIES Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew MOST READ Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Weinstein rape trial View comments The doubled efforts of Tess Rountree and Grethcel Soltones failed to pay off for PayMaya. —AUGUST DELA CRUZBanKo Perlas needed five full sets to push itself out of the basement and pull PayMaya down from the top spot Saturday night.Down two sets to none, the Perlas Spikers painstakingly chipped away at the High Flyers’ advantage and confidence to score an 18-25, 18-25, 25-19, 25-22, 15-11 victory in the Premier Volleyball League Reinforced Conference at Filoil Flying V Centre.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more

Uncertain playing future faces Fort St. John product Scott Ford

first_imgFor the past six seasons Ford has spent the large majority of his career with the Milwaukee Admirals of the American Hockey League. Despite that and being the team’s captain, he admits that where he’ll be playing for the 2014-2015 season is still up in the air.“I’m looking to get a contract right now. I don’t know if it’s going to be back in Milwaukee this year. With Nashville being our NHL affiliate and stuff like that it doesn’t look like it’s going to work out,” he said. “It’s one of those things where I’m in a pool of free agents looking for a contract. It’s a waiting game right now. Obviously there’s a bit of anxiety right now but also excitement as well maybe with a new chapter and transitioning to another organization and maybe get an opportunity there.”Ford is continuing to work hard as he waits for his next opportunity on the ice. He isn’t ready to hang up his skates yet and credits local trainer Phil Hiscock for keeping for keeping him in tip-top shape on the ice.- Advertisement -“If not it may be time to search elsewhere and do other things. I’ve been pretty privileged to have a career that’s lasted ten years. It’s been fantastic. I have a ton of friends, a ton of memories. I’m just mentally or physically ready to be done with it yet. I’m still working hard with a lot of the guys that come back to the community here,” he explained. “Phil Hiscock has been unbelievable for my career the last three years. I’ve been training with him and the stuff that he does with the youth in the city is just fantastic.”Taking part in the North Peace Alumni Hockey School is something that Ford values for a number of reasons such as reuniting with other Fort St. John hockey players while being able to give back to the grass roots level of the sport.last_img read more

High-cancer-risk women urged to get breast MRIs

first_imgATLANTA – Up to 1.4 million U.S. women – those with an unusually high risk of developing breast cancer – should get annual MRIs as well as mammograms, the American Cancer Society advises in new guidelines. And a new medical study suggests that all women newly diagnosed with breast cancer should get MRIs, too. The scans revealed cancers in the other breast that were missed by ordinary mammograms in 3 percent of these cancer survivors. The study came out after the cancer society developed its guidelines, which are the first to recommend MRI for screening women who show no signs of cancer. The guidelines are directed at symptomless women age 30 and older who have a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes; those who were treated for Hodgkin’s disease; or those with a strong family history of the disease, such as women with two or more close relatives who had breast or ovarian cancer or who have a close relative who developed breast cancer before age 50. “It’s very, very expensive,” said Robert Smith, the cancer society’s director of cancer screening. Many insurers cover MRI screenings, but not all do, Smith and others said. Insurers generally follow government guidelines, but the cancer society guidelines could prove influential, according to experts. The new guidelines were being announced Wednesday, the same time the New England Journal of Medicine was releasing a national study that suggests women who have cancer diagnosed in one breast should get an MRI in the other. The study, led by Dr. Constance Lehman of the University of Washington Medical Center, looked at nearly 1,000 women recently diagnosed with cancer in one breast but who had no detected cancer in the second breast. MRIs of the second breast found possible tumors in 121 of the women. Biopsies confirmed cancer in 30 of them. “It’s a pretty striking effect,” said Dr. Carl Jaffe of the National Cancer Institute, which sponsored the study. But it does not suggest MRIs should replace mammograms, which spot calcium deposits better than MRIs do, said Dr. Etta Pisano of the University of North Carolina, one of the study’s authors. “The take-home message of our paper is not, `Don’t get mammography.’ It’s `Get MRI and mammography,”‘ she said. Cancer society officials urged women to carefully choose the clinic that does the MRI. They noted that some facilities that offer MRI lack the expertise and equipment to do an MRI-guided biopsy, meaning the MRI will have to be repeated elsewhere if a possible tumor is found. Breast MRIs should be done at places that do biopsies as well, they said. This year, the American College of Radiology is expected to start a voluntary accreditation program to help ensure the quality of breast MRI testing, cancer society officials said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! As many as 1.4 million women fall into the affected group, according to an American Cancer Society estimate. Doctors usually screen for breast cancer using mammography, an X-ray technique that can spot dense masses like tumors. MRI, or magnetic resonance imaging, makes more detailed images with a magnet and radio waves – but without radiation. MRIs are better at showing increased or abnormal blood flow in the breast, a sign of early cancers not visible on a mammogram. They also are better than mammograms at detecting cancer in women with dense, non-fatty breasts. But MRI screening is not being recommended for most women. One reason is the test’s error rate, which can lead to unnecessary biopsies. Another is the high cost. While a mammogram costs roughly $100 to $150, an MRI can cost $2,000 or more at some medical centers, experts said. last_img