Engineers Without Borders works toward clean water for Ecuador community

first_imgThe Notre Dame chapter of Engineers Without Borders contributed to budding engineering developments abroad in a winter break trip to Ecuador this year.The social service organization is currently in the middle of a five-year partnership with the San Pedro de Suma community in Ecuador. With the assistance of its parent organization, Engineers Without Borders USA, and the mentorship of two engineering professionals, the club has developed a sustainable project in terms of assessment, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. Cristina Interiano | The Observer President of Engineers Without Borders at Notre Dame senior Madelyn Wesoloski believes the personal relationship the club establishes with the community is essential to the success of the project. “There were two projects over winter break that we implemented,” Wesloski said. “We did chlorination at the two schools there and the town really liked it. Because the town was excited about chlorination, it will now be community-wide, which will be another assessment trip. We can extend our commitment with the community a bit, but we try to fit what we can in there. We travel there at least once a year, because if not, they can lose faith in you and you won’t seem invested.”The club started planning for this implementation trip last year. As part of the preparation process, club members did alternative analyses work for the water chlorinator and the wall they built around the schools to prevent animals from getting in (and students from leaving). During the fall, students prepared designs and calculations for the projects.Project lead and senior Jen Lies emphasized that Engineers Without Borders is focused on improving the health and welfare of those in the community. After the club’s assessment trip last year, they determined the water chlorinator was not just something the community wanted, but a pressing need and a project that the club could feasibly do.“Water chlorination is important because there is E. coli in the water. Wastewater treatment there is poor,” Lies said. “The chlorinator hasn’t gone live yet, but we are looking to increase health and general well-being of the community through the quality of water. We got to see designs we had been working on for entire year come into reality, which was awesome. We couldn’t have done it without the strength of partners who are volunteers and community contractors. It was great to see teamwork despite the bumps in the road.”Prior to the winter break implementation trip to Ecuador, members of the club created pamphlets about water chlorination in Spanish for the community to address the stigma associated with water chlorination. They also wrote maintenance and operation manuals so that town members could effectively use the systems. Wesoloski said the San Pedro de Suma community having a hands-on role in the project will ultimately lead to the successful implementation and effective use of the water chlorinator.“One cool thing is that last year the community was unsure about chlorine and water treatment system. Now, they’re asking if we can do it on a community-wide scale. They bought into water treatment as a whole,” Wesoloski said. “The wall was built by local contractors and labor was from the community. That’s another part of this. We don’t go in and do isolated things, but we involve local people and the economy with the projects. They have a lot of local knowledge that makes projects more effective.”Looking towards the future, Engineers Without Borders is expanding their work to projects in South Bend and increasing fundraising to accommodate the growing club. “We want to make sure people are comfortable and have access to the resources they need,” sophomore and treasurer Mike Marino said. “We hope our students learn a lot about the engineering process. Not just how it feels to interact with the community, but also what it feels [like] to make an impact. It is such a fun process with a lot of cooperation, and we know our work has an impact. We do the numbers, help communities with discernment and figure out what it means to be an engineer.”Engineers Without Borders meets Wednesdays at 6 p.m. in Duncan Student Center. Tags: Engineers Without Borders, San Pedro de sumalast_img read more

Tennis News Roger Federer survives elimination in Rome Masters, Nick Kyrgios disqualified for angry rant

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, Tennis News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. Nick Kyrgios stormed off and threw a tantrun which earned him a disqualification.Kyrgios had held a press conference in which he criticised Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic.Nadal entered the next round along with Novak Djokovic. highlightscenter_img New Delhi: Roger Federer saved two match points against Borna Coric to advance to the quarter-finals of the Italian Open as defending champion Rafael Nadal and top seed Novak Djokovic raced through in straight sets. However, Australian firebrand Nick Kyrgios was disqualified on Thursday after a foul-mouthed rant during his third-round match against Norway’s Casper Ruud which could land him with a lengthy suspension. Federer came through 2-6 6-4 7-6 (9/7) against 13th seed Coric after earlier beating Portugal’s Joao Sousa 6-4 6-3 in the second round as players doubled up after rain wiped out play on Wednesday.     Federer, a four-time finalist in Rome, trailed 0-4 before dropping the first set, coming back in the second and saving two match points in the third set tie-break. “Definitely felt like I got a little lucky obviously,” said Federer. “Borna had the lead. There were crucial moments throughout the match, second set and third set, for me to stay in it. Things definitely went my way tonight.”RELATED     Federer next plays Greek eighth seed Stefanos Tsitsipas, who beat Monte Carlo Masters champion Fabio Fognini 6-4 6-3.     Tsitsipas shocked Federer in the fourth round at the Australian Open in January. Nadal, meanwhile, dropped just two games throughout the day, dispatching Georgian Nikoloz Basilashvili 6-1 6-0 in the third round after earlier also dropping just one game against France’s Jeremy Chardy.     “I have been improving every week,” said Nadal, who next plays fellow Spaniard Fernando Verdasco as he targets a first title on clay this season before his French Open defence. “It’s been a peculiar clay court season for me. I had some tough period of time. Has been a little bit difficult to hold the body and the tennis level for every day.”           Djokovic, winner in Madrid last Sunday, beat German Philipp Kohlschreiber 6-3, 6-0 after earlier easing past Canadian Denis Shapovalov 6-1 6-3. The four-time Italian Open winner next plays Argentine seventh seed Juan Martin Del Potro for a place in the semi-finals. “I like the fact that I didn’t play yesterday because I felt like I needed an extra maybe day of rest and recovery a little bit,” said the Serb.  “So it was perfect.”      In the women’s event, Japan’s Naomi Osaka, the top seed, also won twice to retain the world number one ranking ahead of the start of the French Open. She eased into the last eight with a 6-3 6-3 win over Mihaela Buzarnescu after earlier beating Slovak Dominika Cibulkova by the same scoreline. Osaka was at risk of losing her world number one ranking to Simona Halep but the Romanian was knocked out by Czech teenager Marketa Vondrousova losing 2-6 7-5 6-3. Halep’s defeat also guarantees Osaka’s top seeding at the French Open.     Swearing, chair throwing     Kyrgios’s tournament finished early after he threw a chair across the court in a tantrum, before storming off and being disqualified.     The controversial 24-year-old, who had marked his presence in Rome by criticising Djokovic and Nadal in an interview on Wednesday, started arguing with the umpire in the third set. World number 36 Kyrgios had levelled the match at one set all but was given a game penalty early on in the third set for swearing.     His response was to kick out at a water bottle before throwing a chair onto the court, packing his bag and then storming off the court, shouting ‘I am fucking done”           Kyrgios was automatically disqualified with Ruud winning 6-3 6-7 (5/7) 2-1 to advance to the third round before losing to del Potro. “I think he got what he deserved,” said Ruud of Kyrgios who was then fined 20,000 euros and made to forfeit his tournament winnings. Kyrgios had already been at the centre of controversy during Wednesday’s washout when he told the NCR Tennis Podcast that Djokovic had “a sick obsession with wanting to be liked”.     Nadal was described by the Australian as “super-salty”. Fifth seed Dominic Thiem slammed tournament organisers after he was dumped out 4-6 6-4 7-5 by Verdasco. Japan’s Kei Nishikori, the sixth seed, got past American Taylor Fritz 6-2 6-4 and then Jan-Lennard Struff of Germany in three sets.     Czech second seed Petra Kvitova retired in her third-round match against Greece’s Maria Sakkari while trailing 7-5 5-7 4-0 in the third set.last_img read more