Comparing Open Source CMS

first_imgOpen source content management systems aren’t just the ticket for smaller publishers trying to ramp up their Web infrastructure on a tight budget. Larger publishers are opting for open source CMS as well with Drupal and Joomla getting much of the attention. In the chart on the right, Folio: compares some of the features offered by open source with enterprise CMS TeamSite (courtesy of CMSMatrix.org).Comparing Drupal, JoomlaA number of popular publications, including Fast Company, Us Magazine and MacLife, (and FOLIOmag.com:) all use Drupal for their online presence. Drupal is relatively turnkey and makes some interactive elements such as polls readily accessible. “Drupal has gotten to the point where it’s a sophisticated software platform for both trade publishing and in the ‘Web 2.0’ space,” says Paul Maiorana, director of technology and production at Fast Company. The business publication updated its Web site this past February, and looked to Drupal for the user-friendly features it offered, including “community, social networking, blogs, groups, etc.,” he says.While there are few expert developers for Drupal, users can benefit from the feedback of a fairly large community of fellow users. “It enabled us to get to ground really quickly,” Maiorana says. “Out of the box it’s a powerful piece of software, and the developer community is large. We have a small tech staff in house, so we were able to leverage different disciplines” offered by the software. “We worked with a few different Drupal teams to choose the best in each discipline.”The only drawback that Maiorana saw was in manpower. “Drupal developers are in pretty high demand, so we weren’t able to staff up as quickly as we would have liked,” he noted, although he adds that the updated site is now fully staffed.Joomla was chosen by Las Vegas Sports Magazine when the 6,000-circ publisher launched its online presence in January 2007.“Once you set up Joomla, if you know Microsoft Word, you can update the site as needed,” says Web developer Rob Kristie, founder and CEO of RosieDog Creative, who built the site, LVSportsMagazine.com. “It literally took only about two hours’ worth of training to bring the publishers up to speed on managing the Web site.”last_img read more

Woburn District Court HEAT Program Addresses Substance Abuse At 12th Annual Conference

first_imgWOBURN, MA — Hundreds of leaders in public health and law enforcement came together last month for the 12th Annual Woburn District Court Heroin Education Awareness Task Force (H.E.A.T.) Conference to discuss the latest trends and treatment surrounding substance abuse.On Friday, June 15, attendees gathered at the Hilton Boston/Woburn to learn more about drug use and ways to assist those struggling with addiction. The half-day meeting consisted of experts speaking about substance abuse treatment, prevention and enforcement.The H.E.A.T. program was founded by Vincent J. Piro and Michael P. Higgins, of the probation department of Woburn District Court, the police departments of the seven cities and towns under its jurisdiction: Woburn, Burlington, North Reading, Reading, Stoneham, Wilmington and Winchester, the Bureau of Substance Abuse Services and the AdCare Educational Institute. The program is designed to educate the public, especially families and friends of those suffering from addiction, about heroin use and abuse trends among young people.“To all the presenters and attendees who joined us for the 12th annual conference, thank you for making this year a success,” Piro said. “Every year, the Woburn District Court and our partner agencies work to provide life saving resources to those in need, and it is through these collaborations that we have been successful.”Over the last few years, overdose deaths have exceeded motor vehicle crashes as the leading cause of accidental death in the United States. More than a decade ago, H.E.A.T. recognized the growing problem between painkiller abuse and heroin use, and every year works to call attention to deadly synthetic substances in an effort to prevent addiction and deaths.“The H.E.A.T. program has been at the forefront of these issues for almost 13 years,” Woburn Police Chief Robert Ferullo said. “It is the belief of leaders at Friday’s conference that we must collaborate across agencies to provide education to the public on prevention, treatment for those struggling with addiction, and enforcement of the laws to make a difference in the opioid crisis.”To open the conference, Stephen Wood from Winchester Hospital spoke about the rise in popularity of vaping, new substances that are being taken for recreational use (everything from Morning Glory flower seeds to “Flakka” — a synthetic cathinone that causes a number of symptoms like hallucinations and violent behavior) and potential warning signs that a loved one may be using drugs.Britte McBride, Commissioner of Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission, informed attendees about the provisions and regulations that will be in place for the marijuana industry once legalized sales go into effect on July 1, including mandated advertisements to educate consumers and promote safe use of products, stringent security protocols at establishments and testing of products before they go onto the market.Billerica Town Manager John Curran shared his experience with the opioid crisis from a municipal level, using a proactive and reactive approach, while Tewksbury Police Chief Timothy Sheehan spoke about the change in perspective that law enforcement must take to address the opioid epidemic.“We found that we couldn’t arrest our way out of the problem,” Chief Sheehan said. “We were really failing by not going deeper into the issue, and instead just going through the judicial system.”In Tewksbury, the mentality of solely relying on enforcement has been altered and officials are looking at education, collaboration with local agencies and counseling/treatment to address the root of the issue. Additionally, all officers carry Narcan, an opioid reversal drug, to save the lives of those who are overdosing.Michael McLaughlin and Pierce Aliberti, of Stoneham, closed the conference by sharing their experiences and journeys to recovery, thanking those who helped them along the way with resources and support.(NOTE: The above press release is from JGPR.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington Police Attend Heroin Education Awareness Task Force (HEAT) ConferenceIn “Police Log”Woburn District Court H.E.A.T. (Heroin Education Awareness Task Force) Holds 11th Annual ConferenceIn “Government”Wilmington Police Department’s Substance Abuse Efforts Gets Boost From $100,000 Grant & Regional PartnershipIn “Police Log”last_img read more

Mutual funds foreign investors on a buying spree in Indian stock markets

first_imgInvestments by mutual funds (MFs) remained positive for five consecutive days till Sept. 1, coinciding with equity benchmarks reaching new highs on the back of bullish macroeconomic data and buoyant August car and two wheeler sales posted by companies.The trend is likely to continue as manufacturing and service sectors posted exponential growth during August, as evidenced by PMI data.Equity purchases by foreign institutional investors (FIIs) were also in positive territory for the week ended Sept. 2, according to data published by the National Stock Exchange.MFs were net buyers of equities from Aug. 26 to Sept. 1, peaking to a high of Rs. 809 crore on Aug. 31, the day the BSE Sensex hit a new 52-week high. This was on the back of Rs. 701 crore worth of Indian stocks purchased by them on a net basis the previous day. However, on Sept. 1, they almost sold as much as they bought, resulting in new purchases of Rs. 107 crore.The previous trading sessions of Aug. 26 and 29 saw MFs buying stocks worth Rs. 235 crore and Rs. 274 crore on a net basis.While manufacturing PMI for August was at a 13-month high at 52.6, services sector grew at an even faster clip to 54.7, highest since January 2013, according to IHS Markit Nikkei India PMI.”The service sector showed upbeat levels of performance in August. New business was the main driver of activity growth, even amid increased competition for new work,” said Pollyanna De Lima, economist at IHS Markit and author of the report.last_img read more

For The Second Time US Supreme Court Reverses Death Sentence Decision For

first_imgTDCJ/Abby LivingstonThe U.S. Supreme Court first ruled in the death penalty case of Bobby Moore in March 2017.The U.S. Supreme Court has for the second time struck down the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals’ way of determining if a death row inmate is intellectually disabled and eligible for execution.The high court made that determination Tuesday in the case of Bobby Moore, who the court decided is intellectually disabled.Moore’s case highlights the complexities surrounding intellectual disability and the death penalty. The Supreme Court has previously ruled that those with intellectual disabilities can’t be executed, and after reviewing Moore’s case in 2016, tossed out the way the Texas court determines the disability in 2017. The Texas court previously relied on decades-old medical standards and a controversial set of factors created by judges to make the determination, including how well the inmate could lie.Following that ruling, the prosecutor sided with Moore and said that he is intellectually disabled, but the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals still disagreed, claiming last June that he was eligible for execution under current medical standards as well. Now, the high court has stepped in again, and this time, the majority of justices made clear that Moore has shown he is disabled and therefore ineligible for execution. The court’s opinion knocked the Texas Court for relying on the same methods it had ruled against in the 2017 opinion, like focusing on Moore’s strengths instead of his weaknesses, especially strengths gained in a controlled prison environment.The justices also said that despite the Texas court saying it had eliminated its controversial set of factors, which the high court said were problematic for advancing stereotypes, “it seems to have used many of those factors in reaching its conclusion.”“To be sure, the court of appeals opinion is not identical to the opinion we considered in Moore,” the justices wrote. “There are sentences here and there suggesting other modes of analysis consistent with what we said. But there are also sentences here and there suggesting reliance upon what we earlier called ‘lay stereotypes of the intellectually disabled.’”Moore, 59, was sentenced to death more than 38 years ago after he fatally shot a 73-year-old clerk during a Houston robbery in 1980. In 2014, a Texas court determined under current medical standards that Moore was intellectually disabled — with evidence including low IQ scores and his inability to tell time or days of the week as a teenager.But the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals overruled that decision, saying the lower court failed to use its test in making the determination. The Supreme Court invalidated that method upon review.“By rejecting the habeas court’s application of medical guidance and clinging to the standard it laid out … the CCA failed adequately to inform itself of the ‘medical community’s diagnostic framework’,” wrote Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in the 5-3 opinion in 2017.In an unusual step, the prosecutor, Democratic Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg, filed a brief to the Texas court after that ruling agreeing with Moore — stating that he was intellectually disabled and should not be executed. In a surprise June opinion, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals agreed to use current medical standards as a method to determine if a death row inmate had an intellectual disability, but said that Moore still did not qualify.Both Moore and Ogg took the matter up with the justices in Washington, D.C. — marking a rare occurrence of the state and inmate arguing for the same thing. They argued that the Texas court claimed to take up medical standards but largely did the same thing that was slammed by the Supreme Court earlier. They asked the Supreme Court to reverse the Texas court’s decision without holding a hearing, or, if the justices didn’t agree to that, at least grant a second review with oral arguments. The justices took the more drastic step.Moore’s case will now go back to the Court of Criminal Appeals for a new decision, but with the high court saying Moore has shown he is intellectually disabled, he would be ineligible for execution.A difference in this ruling was a concurrence from Chief Justice John Roberts. In 2017, he dissented against the court’s reversal of the Texas court decision, claiming his colleagues’ order on how states should determine intellectual disability “lacked clarity.” On Tuesday, he said that problem still exists, but it’s “easy to see” the Court of Criminal Appeals missed the mark.“The court repeated the same errors that this Court previously condemned,” he wrote.Among the most conservative justices, Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas and Neil Gorsuch dissented from the majority opinion, saying, like Roberts, that the lack of clarity in how states should rule is the fault of the Supreme Court. They also criticized the majority for its “foray into factfinding” in making a decision on Moore’s disability, as opposed to its role of judicial review.The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals was left on its own in making these decisions. The Texas judges have begged the state Legislature for nearly two decades to come up with a process for determining whether death penalty defendants are intellectually disabled. This year, the few lawmakers who repeatedly file bills on the topic, have hoped that Moore’s case can make their legislation pass.Elsa Alcala, who until January was a judge on the Court of Criminal Appeals and dissented against her colleagues in both of the Moore decisions, said Tuesday’s ruling by the high court brought tears to her eyes.“It feels like the weight of the world has lifted for a moment in time,” she said.This article was originally published in The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.  Sharelast_img read more