STUDENT SPOTLIGHT 7 Wilmington Students Named To Deans List At Bryant University

first_imgSMITHFIELD, RI — Bryant University is committed to the pursuit, recognition, and celebration of academic excellence. The University is pleased to recognize the following Wilmington students who have been named to the Deans’ List for the spring 2019 semester:Brian Cavanaugh, class of 2020Robert DuCharme, class of 2021Justin Kannally, class of 2020Alexa Kelley, class of 2022Anthony McKearney, class of 2022Nicholas Poli, class of 2020Zachary Richards, class of 2021About Bryant UniversityFor 156 years, Bryant University has been at the forefront of delivering an exceptional education that anticipates the future and prepares students to be innovative leaders of character in a changing world. Bryant delivers an innovative and uniquely integrated business and liberal arts education that inspires students to excel. With approximately 3,700 graduate and undergraduate students from 38 states and 53 countries, Bryant is recognized as a leader in international education and regularly receives top rankings from U.S. News and World Report, Bloomberg Businessweek, Forbes, and Barron’s.(NOTE: The above announcement is from Bryant University via Merit.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 3 Wilmington Students Graduate From Bryant UniversityIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 3 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At Regis CollegeIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 4 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At WPIIn “Education”last_img read more

For The Second Time US Supreme Court Reverses Death Sentence Decision For

first_imgTDCJ/Abby LivingstonThe U.S. Supreme Court first ruled in the death penalty case of Bobby Moore in March 2017.The U.S. Supreme Court has for the second time struck down the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals’ way of determining if a death row inmate is intellectually disabled and eligible for execution.The high court made that determination Tuesday in the case of Bobby Moore, who the court decided is intellectually disabled.Moore’s case highlights the complexities surrounding intellectual disability and the death penalty. The Supreme Court has previously ruled that those with intellectual disabilities can’t be executed, and after reviewing Moore’s case in 2016, tossed out the way the Texas court determines the disability in 2017. The Texas court previously relied on decades-old medical standards and a controversial set of factors created by judges to make the determination, including how well the inmate could lie.Following that ruling, the prosecutor sided with Moore and said that he is intellectually disabled, but the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals still disagreed, claiming last June that he was eligible for execution under current medical standards as well. Now, the high court has stepped in again, and this time, the majority of justices made clear that Moore has shown he is disabled and therefore ineligible for execution. The court’s opinion knocked the Texas Court for relying on the same methods it had ruled against in the 2017 opinion, like focusing on Moore’s strengths instead of his weaknesses, especially strengths gained in a controlled prison environment.The justices also said that despite the Texas court saying it had eliminated its controversial set of factors, which the high court said were problematic for advancing stereotypes, “it seems to have used many of those factors in reaching its conclusion.”“To be sure, the court of appeals opinion is not identical to the opinion we considered in Moore,” the justices wrote. “There are sentences here and there suggesting other modes of analysis consistent with what we said. But there are also sentences here and there suggesting reliance upon what we earlier called ‘lay stereotypes of the intellectually disabled.’”Moore, 59, was sentenced to death more than 38 years ago after he fatally shot a 73-year-old clerk during a Houston robbery in 1980. In 2014, a Texas court determined under current medical standards that Moore was intellectually disabled — with evidence including low IQ scores and his inability to tell time or days of the week as a teenager.But the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals overruled that decision, saying the lower court failed to use its test in making the determination. The Supreme Court invalidated that method upon review.“By rejecting the habeas court’s application of medical guidance and clinging to the standard it laid out … the CCA failed adequately to inform itself of the ‘medical community’s diagnostic framework’,” wrote Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in the 5-3 opinion in 2017.In an unusual step, the prosecutor, Democratic Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg, filed a brief to the Texas court after that ruling agreeing with Moore — stating that he was intellectually disabled and should not be executed. In a surprise June opinion, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals agreed to use current medical standards as a method to determine if a death row inmate had an intellectual disability, but said that Moore still did not qualify.Both Moore and Ogg took the matter up with the justices in Washington, D.C. — marking a rare occurrence of the state and inmate arguing for the same thing. They argued that the Texas court claimed to take up medical standards but largely did the same thing that was slammed by the Supreme Court earlier. They asked the Supreme Court to reverse the Texas court’s decision without holding a hearing, or, if the justices didn’t agree to that, at least grant a second review with oral arguments. The justices took the more drastic step.Moore’s case will now go back to the Court of Criminal Appeals for a new decision, but with the high court saying Moore has shown he is intellectually disabled, he would be ineligible for execution.A difference in this ruling was a concurrence from Chief Justice John Roberts. In 2017, he dissented against the court’s reversal of the Texas court decision, claiming his colleagues’ order on how states should determine intellectual disability “lacked clarity.” On Tuesday, he said that problem still exists, but it’s “easy to see” the Court of Criminal Appeals missed the mark.“The court repeated the same errors that this Court previously condemned,” he wrote.Among the most conservative justices, Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas and Neil Gorsuch dissented from the majority opinion, saying, like Roberts, that the lack of clarity in how states should rule is the fault of the Supreme Court. They also criticized the majority for its “foray into factfinding” in making a decision on Moore’s disability, as opposed to its role of judicial review.The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals was left on its own in making these decisions. The Texas judges have begged the state Legislature for nearly two decades to come up with a process for determining whether death penalty defendants are intellectually disabled. This year, the few lawmakers who repeatedly file bills on the topic, have hoped that Moore’s case can make their legislation pass.Elsa Alcala, who until January was a judge on the Court of Criminal Appeals and dissented against her colleagues in both of the Moore decisions, said Tuesday’s ruling by the high court brought tears to her eyes.“It feels like the weight of the world has lifted for a moment in time,” she said.This article was originally published in The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them — about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues.  Sharelast_img read more

Artistic nuances

first_imgAn exhibition of paintings and sculptures titled ‘Ballad of Love’, curated by well known artist Poonam S Kohli, will be held from March 7-11 at Open Palm Court Gallery, India Habitat Centre in the national Capital. This artistic extravaganza features 22 participating artists and four guest artists. Some of the participating artists include Dalip Chandolia, Roop Chand, Poonam Singh Kohli and well known guest artists like Padma Bhushan Sri Ram Vir Sutar, Alka Raghuvanshi, Vijender Sharma and Anil Sutar. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Poonam Kohli, herself is a well-known artist and sculptor. She feels it is imperative to give a platform to contemporary upcoming as well as well-known artists. She feels that promoting art and artists will go a long way in making their works more visible and will attract wider audiences. Dalip’s paintings are infused with happiness and joy. The motif of the bird is symbolic of peace and serenity and brings with it the hope of dawn and new beginnings. Bright colours are used consciously to instil a feeling of energy and vibrancy in his paintings. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with Netflix“My paintings always depict happiness and joy of life. Bird is a symbol of peace and serenity. I have a feeling that by making these birds my work has become more lively and admirable as it gives my viewers a hope and a certain amount of pleasure when they look at them. “I use only bright and eye catching colours to show happiness and instill energy in my paintings”, said Dalip Chandolia.Fusing the splendid themes of love and peace, Roop Chand makes his masterpieces stand out. Spanning over twenty years, the transformation in his works is towering. Entrenched in Indian heritage, his superlative artworks will indubitably imprison your psyche. Where: Open Palm Court, India Habitat CentreWhen: March 7-11Timing: 11 am to 8 pmlast_img read more