“Genomic Junk” Is Cell’s Air-Traffic Control

first_img51; Linc-RNAs (large intervening non-coding RNAs) have been promoted from junk molecules to air traffic controllers.  A mystery about these transcripts of DNA that are not translated into proteins is being explained.    Science Daily reported on work at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and the Broad Institute that found these RNA molecules perform a vital task.  “linc-RNAs, once dismissed as ‘genomic junk’ – have a global role in genome regulation, ferrying proteins to assist their regulation at specific regions of the genome.”  Results were published in the July 14 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.“I like to think of them as genetic air traffic controllers,” explains co-senior author John Rinn, PhD, a Harvard Medical School Assistant Professor of Pathology at BIDMC and Associate Member of the Broad Institute.  “It has long been a mystery as to how widely expressed proteins shape the fate of cells.  How does the same protein know to regulate one genomic location in a brain cell and regulate a different genomic region in a liver cell?  Our study suggests that in the same way that air traffic controllers organize planes in the air, lincRNAs may be organizing key chromatin complexes in the cell.”It has been known for some time that small RNA transcripts are involved in gene regulation, but link-RNAs are often thousands of base pairs long.  The article said, “they seemed more like genomic oddities than key players” till now.  “With these latest findings, which also uncovered an additional 1,500 lincRNAs, it’s clear these RNA molecules are no mere messengers – they have demonstrated that they can and do play a leading role.”    Speaking of differences in brain cells and liver cells, another article on Science Daily smashed a paradigm: “DNA Not The Same In Every Cell Of Body: Major Genetic Differences Between Blood And Tissue Cells Revealed.”  A discovery by Montreal scientists “calls into question one of the most basic assumptions of human genetics: that when it comes to DNA, every cell in the body is essentially identical to every other cell.”  It appears that biologists and geneticists are finding new complexities in the way genes are distributed and regulated in body cells.  The discoveries may lead to better understanding of the factors that make cells in various tissues look and behave differently.Neither of these articles needed evolutionary theory.  When the trend in scientific discovery is to uncover more and more complexity, regulation, and function such that air traffic control is the analogy that comes to mind, intelligent design “leaps up as the most likely explanation,” as Jonathan Wells put it.  Pilot Charlie, preferring unguided processes, appears headed for a nose dive.(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

CAIRSan Diego holds press conference on Punish a Muslim Day

first_img Elizabeth Alvarez Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter April 3, 2018 CAIR-San Diego holds press conference on ‘Punish a Muslim Day’ 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsFliers are going viral on social media claiming Tuesday is “Punish a Muslim Day.”The fliers have made their way onto Facebook and Twitter, and it’s a serious concern for the American-Muslim communities.KUSI’s Elizabeth Alvarez was LIVE with the San Diego Office of the Council on American Islamic Relations. Posted: April 3, 2018 Elizabeth Alvarez, last_img read more

Alex Montoya on his latest book Living Inspired

first_img KUSI Newsroom, November 4, 2018 Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Alex Montoya, on his latest book Living Inspired 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Alex Montoya is a motivational speaker whose spoken at places like Harvard and NASA.He was nice enough to join us Sunday morning to tell us about his newest book titled Living Inspired. Posted: November 4, 2018 KUSI Newsroom last_img read more

Swizz Beatzs Dreamweavers Exhibit Spotlights Black Renaissance Visual Works

first_img Twitter Swizz Beatz’s Dreamweavers Exhibit Spotlights “Black Renaissance” Visual Works Swizz Beatz collaborate with UTA and curator Nicola Vassell to bring together uncanny and powerful works by leading African-American and African diaspora artists, past and presentPhilip MerrillGRAMMYs Jan 31, 2019 – 4:14 pm On Jan. 30, Los Angeles’ UTA Artist Space and GRAMMY winner Swizz Beatz announced a fine art exhibit titled “Dreamweavers” will open on Feb. 13, dedicated to paintings, sculptures, photographs and performance art by visionaries of the Afro-Atlantic diaspora. Curated by Nicola Vassell, who advises Beatz and his wife Alicia Keys on their The Dean Collection of fine art, the choice selection presents passionate and little-known works from what Vassell considers an emerging “black renaissance.””It’s a super positive moment in that these narratives are being embedded institutionally,” Vassell told Billboard, “and the consequence of that is economic success and cultural influence.”The artist Kehinde Wiley became better known due to his presidential portrait of Obama and presence of his paintings on sets for the TV show “Empire.” Also in the exhibit are Nick Cave (the dancer, not the rocker), Karon Davis, Cy Gavin, David Hammons, Hector Hyppolite, Arthur Jafa, Pope L, Deanna Lawson, Kerry James Marshall, Yoyin Ojih Odutola, Noah Purifoy, Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Tschabalala Self, Ming Smith, Nari Ward, Carrie Mae Weems, and Charles White. News Facebook Email Swizz Beatz’s Exhibit Spotlights Visual Works swizz-beatzs-dreamweavers-exhibit-spotlights-%E2%80%9Cblack-renaissance%E2%80%9D-visual-works “This show had to happen right here, right now,” said Beatz. “Many of the artists are my friends and some of the works you’ll see on view are from The Dean Collection … It’s a family gathering, Nicola is my long-time collaborator and UTA was passionate from the beginning.””Dreamweavers” offers an artistic confrontation with imagery that can seem like a surreal escape from reality while also providing the strength to cope with present-day challenges creatively. The website for UTA Artist Space features works selected for “Dreamweavers,” and the exhibit will remain in place until April 13. Swizz Beatz: Inside The Philosophy Of A Hip-Hop HitmakerRead more https://twitter.com/THEREALSWIZZZ/status/1090817857892638720last_img read more