STUDENT SPOTLIGHT 7 Wilmington Students Named To Deans List At Bryant University

first_imgSMITHFIELD, RI — Bryant University is committed to the pursuit, recognition, and celebration of academic excellence. The University is pleased to recognize the following Wilmington students who have been named to the Deans’ List for the spring 2019 semester:Brian Cavanaugh, class of 2020Robert DuCharme, class of 2021Justin Kannally, class of 2020Alexa Kelley, class of 2022Anthony McKearney, class of 2022Nicholas Poli, class of 2020Zachary Richards, class of 2021About Bryant UniversityFor 156 years, Bryant University has been at the forefront of delivering an exceptional education that anticipates the future and prepares students to be innovative leaders of character in a changing world. Bryant delivers an innovative and uniquely integrated business and liberal arts education that inspires students to excel. With approximately 3,700 graduate and undergraduate students from 38 states and 53 countries, Bryant is recognized as a leader in international education and regularly receives top rankings from U.S. News and World Report, Bloomberg Businessweek, Forbes, and Barron’s.(NOTE: The above announcement is from Bryant University via Merit.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 3 Wilmington Students Graduate From Bryant UniversityIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 3 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At Regis CollegeIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 4 Wilmington Students Named To Dean’s List At WPIIn “Education”last_img read more

SC rejects Khaledas plea to change court

first_imgBNP chairperson Khaleda Zia. File photoThe Appellate Division of the Supreme Court on Monday rejected a petition filed by Bangladesh Nationalist Party chairperson Khaleda Zia to change the court to hold hearing of Zia Orphanage Trust Graft case against her, reports UNB. A five-member bench led by acting chief justice M Wahab Miah passed the order. Earlier, on Sunday, after concluding hearing, the SC set today (Monday) for delivering verdict. Khaleda Zia filed the petition on 6 August. Later, the High Court rejected the petition on 20 August. The Anti-Corruption Commission filed the Zia Orphanage Trust graft case on 3 July, 2008 with Ramna policestation accusing Khaleda Zia, her eldest son Tarique Rahman, now living in the UK after securing bail, and four others for misappropriating over Tk 21. 0 million (2.10 crore) that came as grants from a foreign bank for orphans.last_img read more

Garden with 70 species of aquatic plants

first_imgRaqibul Hasan tends to his aquatic plants in Narayanganj recently. Photo: Prothom AloGardening is a common hobby and rooftop gardens are gaining popularity in Bangladesh. But a garden with aquatic plants is not a common scene.Such a special garden with 70 species of aquatic plants has been traced in Narayanganj’s Fatulla. Raqibul Hasan, 33, has created his garden in the yard and rooftop of his Panchabati residence, collecting floating plants from home and abroad.Asked how it all started, Raqibul said, “It was 2015 and we, my wife and I, were visiting Cox’s Bazar. As my wife loves blue water lilies, I collected one from there. Soon collecting aquatic plants and growing them in containers became a passion for me.”Water bodies are shrinking every day in the concrete jungle of urban life. And so are the aquatic plants. Raqibul built the garden to archive the rare aquatic plants which are facing the danger of extinction.Speaking about his collection, Raqibul said he has a total of 44 species of water lilies including Victoria Amazon Lily and Hardy Water Lily.”Usually, you’ll find three kinds of water lilies in Bangladesh. But in my collection, I have seven local species including Pink Water Lily which is very rare,” he added.Besides the local ones, Raqibul collected the remaining 37 species of water lilies from Thailand, Mexico, Europe, USA and other countries.Raqibul has a collection of six lotus species, too. Local but rare Swarnakumud and Jhanji are also there in his garden.Raqibul Hasan shows his aquatic plants to visitors in Narayanganj recently. Photo: Prothom AloHe started the garden from a kind of passion. But, it is now a source of income for him. He has been selling saplings of aquatic plants for the past few years.Taslim Abed, an official of a pharmaceutical factory in Gazipur, collects aquatic plants from Raqibul.”By gardening and keeping aquatic plants on the rooftop of our factory, we can bring down the temperature from 52 degree Celsius to 38,” Taslim said.Deputy director of Narayanganj agriculture extension department, Kazi Habibur Rahman, also praised Raqibul saying, “It’s a great endeavour. If others follow him, we can leave a better world for our next generation.”After collecting 70 species of floating plants, Raqibul does not want to stop. He has plans to keep 100 species of water lilies and 50 species of lotus by this year.*This report, originally published in Prothom Alo print edition, has been rewritten in English by Imam Hossain.last_img read more

Workers dragged Forbidden City stones along roads of artificial ice

first_img Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Phys.org) —Fifteenth and sixteenth century Chinese workers transported enormous stones to the Forbidden City by carrying them in sledges along roads of artificial ice, according to Jiang Li of the University of Science and Technology in Beijing and his colleagues. The researchers translated a document showing that in 1557, workers used this method to transport a 123-ton stone more than 70 kilometers. Li and his team say that dragging large stones over ice, rather than over dry ground, reduced the amount of friction created and the number of workers needed for the job. The study appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Construction of China’s Forbidden City, in present-day Beijing, began in 1417. The home of China’s emperors for almost 500 years, The Forbidden City incorporates stones weighing more than 100 tons extracted from the Dashiwo quarry, 70 kilometers away. The heaviest of these is the Large Stone Carving, which weighs more than 300 tons.Previous researchers assumed that the Chinese used wheeled vehicles to move the stones. The Chinese were using wheeled vehicles for transport by around 1500 BC, and there are no images of workers dragging stones over dry ground. However, none of the wheeled vehicles built before 1596 could carry more than 95 tons. Although some books mention that workers used an artificial ice path to transport the Large Stone Carving, there are no detailed historical records of this event.Li and his colleagues translated a Chinese text written in 1618 that describes how workers brought a 123-ton stone to the Forbidden City in 1557, during a mid-winter renovation project. The workers placed the stone on a sledge, which they then dragged along an artificial ice path, created by pouring well water onto the ground and then allowing the water to freeze. They dug wells every half kilometer. By pouring water over ice that had already frozen, they created a liquid surface that decreased the friction between the sledge and the ice. The workers had time to move the sledge across the liquid film before it froze.The team calculated that it would have taken 1,537 men to drag the load over dry ground. Dragging a sledge over ice would have required 338 men. Lubricating the ice would have reduced the workforce to 46 men. An ice road also eliminated the need to lay out wooden planks to create a smooth surface.Architects of the reconstruction debated whether to use sledges or mule-driven wagons. They chose sledges because they were safer and more reliable than wagons, although sledges required more time, money and manpower.The research suggests that, at the time, Chinese engineers knew more about friction than Western engineers did. Workers likely slid massive stones, such as this 300-ton marble carving in front of the Hall of Supreme Harmony in the Forbidden City, Beijing, China, along artificial ice paths. Credit: Chui Hu More information: Ice lubrication for moving heavy stones to the Forbidden City in 15th- and 16th-century China, PNAS, www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/10/30/1309319110AbstractLubrication plays a crucial role in reducing friction for transporting heavy objects, from moving a 60-ton statue in ancient Egypt to relocating a 15,000-ton building in modern society. Although in China spoked wheels appeared ca. 1500 B.C., in the 15th and 16th centuries sliding sledges were still used in transporting huge stones to the Forbidden City in Beijing. We show that an ice lubrication technique of water-lubricated wood-on-ice sliding was used instead of the common ancient approaches, such as wood-on-wood sliding or the use of log rollers. The technique took full advantage of the natural properties of ice, such as sufficient hardness, flatness, and low friction with a water film. This ice-assisted movement is more efficient for such heavy-load and low-speed transportation necessary for the stones of the Forbidden City. The transportation of the huge stones provides an early example of ice lubrication and complements current studies of the high-speed regime relevant to competitive ice sports. The mechanism that puts the curl in the curling stone revealedcenter_img Citation: Workers dragged Forbidden City stones along roads of artificial ice (2013, November 5) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-11-workers-forbidden-city-stones-roads.html © 2013 Phys.org Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more